Sneak Peek: Wellness Workshops at Dweb Camp

Site of the DWeb Camp 2019

We’re excited to gather technologists, creatives and visionaries together for an amazing 4-day weekend, July 18-21, at the first DWeb Camp.  As we work to build a better internet in this beautiful natural location, it’s a chance to consider the impact that our technology has on societies, ecosystems and the world.

To explore the significant role we play in these complex systems, DWeb Camp will feature a series of wellness workshops to help us deepen our connection with each other and our ecosystem at large. For many, life on the internet can become disembodying over time; we lose our grounding in the reality of the natural environment. What happens when we think about our networks in the context of both the digital and physical realms?

Convene a conversation around the firepit with the ocean at your back. It’s a chance to look up from our screens and connect.

DWeb Camp takes place on farm land that has a unique history. The stewards of this farm are cultivating new methods of growing food and generating energy. The farm is not just a pretty backdrop–we hope it will catalyze some meaningful discussions about our connections to each other and the planet.

At DWeb Camp, anyone can propose a workshop or discussion—there will be plenty of time for self-organizing. In the meantime, here are some workshops focusing on wellness that you can look forward to:

Regenerative Agriculture: This is a system of farming principles and practices that increase biodiversity, enrich soils and improve watersheds. Our hosts are building a regenerative farm  that can capture carbon and water in soil, reversing the global trends of CO2 accumulation.

Learn how the farm is using no-till gardening, beneficial insects, and microbiology to nourish the soil. Get your hands dirty transplanting crops while workshop leaders, Cassie and Jared, teach us about these regenerative practices that actually improve the planet.

Permaculture: Are mushroom spawn and worm casings your jam? Then join Cassie and Jared in a hands-on lesson on using King Stropharia mushrooms to create the richest soil for your garden. They’ll show you how to build a kitchen compost worm bin so your soil can be as rich as theirs!

Decentralized Renewable Energy: The Farm is on a path to installing an energy super-system: integrating wind, solar and water to produce more energy than they need for themselves. Joshua Tree, founder of Butterfly Power, will lead a workshop from Powerhouse 1, his mobile renewable energy trailer. How can each of us offset our own carbon footprint? If you bring a solar kit, Joshua Tree will help you install a solar panel on your car or RV, while exploring the future of mobile renewable energy. Order your solar kit ahead of time to do your own or help someone else!

Grow Your Own Edible Mushrooms: Growing edible mushrooms is easy and fun. Expert mycologist, Stephanie Manara, will show you how to inoculate a log for different types of mushrooms, leading to multiple years worth of edible fungi! Take yours home or put together a mushroom grow kit to spread in your garden later. Along the way, Stephanie will share the benefits, science and lore of mycelia!

Plant Walk: With paper microscopes in hand, take a guided tour of  the native plants and seeds at the Farm. Seed saving is one of the most powerful skills a farmer (or backyard gardener) can practice. Learn how to become a seed steward from Steve Peters, founder of the Organic Seed Alliance. The planet’s seed diversity is rapidly decreasing, but we can change that starting right in our own backyards.

Fermentation: For centuries, our ancestors have understood the benefits of fermentation—from food preservation to using microbes for good gut health. Cassie will lead a workshop on fermenting vegetables for probiotic health and delicious cuisine.

Farm Tour: Hop in a 4-wheel drive vehicle with Bill, the Farm’s resident historian. He’ll trace the land’s roots, from the Amah Mutsun tribe through today’s vision for these largely uncultivated 700 acres. From ocean to forest, creek to lake, Bill will share the story of this amazing stretch of Pacific coast land.

Making Honey: Experience the bees of the Pacific Coast and help make a batch of Lion’s Mane Mushroom honey. Tasting is encouraged!

Hemp Workshop: What other plant can be transformed into a medicine, paper, textiles, clothing, biodegradable plastics, paint, insulation, biofuel, food, or animal feed? For 10,000 years, hemp has been woven into useful products. The Farm is soon to be a center for thriving hemp production. Josh West takes you on a tour through history, a green house and the many uses of this versatile plant.

Cacao Ceremony: Cacao is a fruit best known for its use in producing chocolate. But cacao is also a natural stimulant that can lead you to a warming, heart-opening experience. Matt Siegel, founder of the Envision Festival, will lead participants through a ceremony using Ecuadorian, fair-trade cacao. Come open your heart and increase your ability to connect—to yourself, to others and to the planet.

Stargazing and Myths: Take a hike up the hill to one of the area’s great stargazing spots.  Weather permitting, Joanna and Ben will show you how to identify the constellations and share myths that the Greeks spun out of the stars.

Join Us –Reserve Your Ticket today

Interested in leading a workshop? Want to organize a discussion? You’re welcome to! Please let us know here. We will share more information on organizing workshops.

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Money and Utopia at the Internet Archive

Guest blog post by Author Finn Brunton

The history of money is history itself. From the accounting and contracts of Sumerian cuneiform tablets (the earliest written language) to buried coin hoards, stamps and letters of credit, Incan khipu knot-counts, or the maps and censuses written in the service of levying taxes, part of the great archive from which history is made are the records of cash, debt, credit, assets, and coinage. 

A lot of that archive is durable: cowry shells, wooden tally-sticks, clay tablets, coins buried under floorboards or in the hulls of sunken ships. (/Rai/ stones, the indigenous currency of the Micronesian island of Yap, will outlast us all.) And a lot of that archive gives people their own incentives to preserve and maintain: saving precious metals, stock certificates, banknotes, deeds, or the proofs of kinship debts and IOUs. But most of the money transacted now is electronic. How could you write the history of digital cash?

That’s where the Internet Archive comes in. About eight years ago I began work in earnest on a book about the prehistory of cryptocurrency: the technologies, visions, subcultures, and fantasies that drove the project of building digital objects that could work like cash — anonymous transactions with money that could prove itself, as a dollar does, rather than needing the identities of the transactors, like a credit card. 

Digging up this history meant a crash course in the history of money itself — and, as strange as this might sound, the /history/ of the history of money, how people thought about what money meant and how to read it at different times, with collections like the Newman Numismatic Portal and documents like the playwright and poet Joseph Addison’s marvelous 1726 “Dialogues Upon the Usefulness of Ancient Medals,” a kind of dreamy, melancholy short story about coins, poetry, and the legacies of the past.

It also meant leaning about various utopian projects which used new forms of money and economic schemes to try to change society — these were often led the sort of ahead-of-their-time, or out-of-this-world, characters whose archives are, to put it gently, difficult to find. Not for the Internet Archive, though: the documents of the strange project of American Technocracy in the 1930s — like an autobiography written from the perspective of the economic price system! — are, through phone, tablet, or mouse, at one’s fingertips.

The book, focused as it is on small circles of monetary and cryptographic utopians in the Bay Area of California from the 1970s through the arrival of Bitcoin, also required study of the subcultures, publications, and movements within which my subjects crossed paths and dreamed big dreams — venues like Mondo 2000 (individual issues are incredibly rich time capsules and the people around Ted Nelson’s amazing Xanadu. But, of course, many of these people were among the first to leave print behind and begin writing and publishing primarily online — especially on the fragile, ephemeral Web. Which is where the Wayback Machine came in! Here crucial developments that would otherwise be lost were preserved, like Hal Finney’s “reusable proof of work” token system — an important step toward what would become Bitcoin and subsequent cryptocurrency and blockchain systems.

The book that I built using all these archives was written over the course of several years in many places, from the back seat of a car in the Colorado Rockies to a family farm in rural Quebec, a laundromat in New Hampshire, and a cabin in Finland, but anywhere that I could get the faintest wireless signal, these archives — and many more — were with me. (As a user of the search engine DuckDuckGo, “!archive” and “!wayback” are my favorite, reflexive search operators.) Some of the earliest discussions of computerized, digital money happened in the context of dreams of what networked computing could be: the world’s libraries and archives, across all media, on your “home information terminal,” available at a gesture. With the Internet Archive, that utopia is at last being realized.

BOOK LAUNCH EVENT
Join us Tuesday, June 25th at the Internet Archive in San Francisco for the book launch of DIGITAL CASH: The Unknown History of the Anarchists, Utopians, and Technologists Who Created Cryptocurrency by Finn Brunton.

Date: Tuesday, June 25th 2019
Time: Doors Open: 6:00 PM
In Conversation with Finn Brunton: 6:30 – 7:45 PM
Reception: 7:45 – 9:00 PM
Light refreshments will be served. Finn Brunton’s book will also be available for purchase and signing during the reception, courtesy of The Green Arcade bookstore.
Where: Internet Archive
300 Funston Ave
SF, CA 94118

About the Author: Finn Brunton (finnb.net) is the author of Spam: A Shadow History of the Internet (2013) and Digital Cash: The Unknown History of the Anarchists, Technologists, and Utopians Who Created Cryptocurrency (2019), and the co-author of Obfuscation: A User’s Guide for Privacy and Protest (2015) and Communication (2019). He teaches in Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University.

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Branding the Decentralized Web

The new DWeb logo draws inspiration from our colorful code base!

The Decentralized Web is a concept. It’s a set of technologies. It’s a network of builders and designers and dreamers. What started with small gatherings in San Francisco, London, Los Angeles, Toronto and Berlin is growing into a global movement. So how do we visually convey the identity of this idea we call the “DWeb”?

Designer, Iryna Nezhynska, has created a flexible, new brand identity for the DWeb community.

That’s the assignment that Berlin-based designer, Iryna Nezhynska, volunteered to take on. Born in Ukraine, she developed her skills in brand agencies based in Warsaw, designing for some of the world’s largest brands: Lindt Chocolates, Mercedes/Daimler, John Deere. But Nezhynska’s joy came from working with startups, helping small teams express their collective vision. Today, she is the digital designer for Jolocom, the Berlin-based team building tools for self-sovereign identity. “Visual design is in my bones,” Nezhynska told me. “Branding is the air I breathe.”

“If you are a visual communication designer—you aren’t a graphic designer or an artist,” Nezhynska explained. “You are a translator of the emotions/ideas/values that a group wants to communicate. You translate it into a visual language.” So the first step is understanding the “personality” of the brand. How it should feel and speak. Nezhynska began by launching a survey for community members in Berlin, Toronto and San Francisco. Collectively, we imagined the DWeb’s to be “friendly,” “open-minded” and “playful.” But it is also a dynamic change-agent, prioritizing people over technology.

When it came to designing the logo, Nezhynska first had to consider the ubiquitous image of connected nodes that have come to represent the blockchain. “That graphic is so overused,” she ruminated. “I tried to find out who actually came up with it and why it became the blockchain symbol. The blockchain graphic is random, but it has movement. I wanted to build on the common associations of the blockchain, but push the idea further. So I thought, what if we take the graphic and delete the sharp edges, transforming the lines into the D shape? Could we make the cluster of dots ‘live’ within the D? I want people to play with the brand. You can use the D or just suggest it.”

The logo’s central shape is a simple dot. “The concept is that we have different size dots. There are many people building Web 3.0, but they have different influence. They are living and moving. Small dots can become bigger over time. Yet it’s one community,” Nezhynska explained. In her flexible design concept, the dot can be a balloon, a fingerprint, a face. A speck of light. She sought to create pattern and consistency, yet enough free space to allow people to play.

“A logo should be breathing and have a heartbeat.  Every dot changes size. Every dot beats differently.  A beautiful cacophony.” –Iryna Nezhynska, designer

Next, given the values of the Decentralized Web around open source code and free iteration, Nezhynska looked for an open source font and landed on Lab Mono, a typeface created by a Berlin-based coder and designer, Martin Wecke.

Yet designing the logo was only the beginning of the brand assignment. With the DWeb personality firmly in mind, Nezhynska next set off in search of the right visuals, colors and applications in the real world to create a mood board. Taken together, the logo and mood board create a memorable look and feel.  “The moodboard should be the brand’s ‘North Star,” Nezhynska explained. “If you apply it consistently across all visual touchpoints, even if you delete the logo, you should still be able to identity the brand. It’s that consistent. That recognizable.”

How can the world use this brand identity? We see the DWeb as a global community, adding new nodes in cities around the globe. Each city can adopt its own color: SF might be yellow, Berlin red.

At DWeb Camp, Nezhynska will lead a  workshop to design UX/UI for a central landing page that will direct you to DWeb groups and events around the world. She envisions a community akin to Creative Commons, now in 150 cities with local ambassadors creating events: meet ups, camps, an Annual Summit.  “I hope the DWeb can keep the money aspects at bay,” the designer mused. “If you run a local community you aren’t promoting your own brand, you are promoting the community.”

And five years from now? “If the community keeps the brand alive and growing, in five years the visual won’t be so important,” Nezhynska said. “But the tonal voice will be important. Friendly. Playful. Human. The brand personality should persist.”

To build the DWeb Brand with Iryna Nezhynska, register for DWeb Camp, July 18-21. Join her workshop to extend the global brand.

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Cult of the Dead Cow Book Reading and Discussion —Tuesday June 18 at 6pm

Watch a recording from the evening here!

Join us on June 18, 2019 at the the Internet Archive for a book reading and panel discussion about — and with — some of the original hacking supergroup, the Cult of the Dead Cow. Modern security owes much to this irreverent group, whose members pioneered both smart independent security research and hacking for human rights.

The event is in celebration of the new book by veteran technology reporter, Joseph Menn, entitled Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World. Light refreshments and small snacks will be provided, and books will be available for purchase. Tickets are free, but donations are greatly appreciated. The event will also be live-streamed on our YouTube channel.

RSVP HERE

EFF and the Internet Archive Present:
Cult of the Dead Cow Book Reading & Discussion

Date: Tuesday June 18, 2019
Time: 6:00-9:00 pm
Where: Internet Archive
300 Funston Ave. SF, CA 94118

Schedule:
• Reception: 6:00-7:00 pm
• Reading by Joseph Menn: 7:00-7:15 pm
• Panel Discussion: 7:15-8:15 pm
• Post-Panel Mingling: 8:15-9:00 pm

Speaker:
Joseph Menn – author of Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World

Panel:
MC: Cindy Cohn – Executive Director of EFF
Chris Rioux – BO2k (Back Orifice 2000) author and Veracode founder
Window Snyder – cDc fellow traveler and former core security staffer at Microsoft and Apple and now Square
Omega – formerly anonymous cDc text file editor

GET YOUR FREE TICKETS HERE

Posted in Event, Past Event | 1 Comment

The IA Client – The Swiss Army Knife of Internet Archive

As someone who’s uploaded hundreds of thousands of items to the Internet Archive’s stacks and who has probably done a few million transactions with the materials over the years, I just “know” about the Internet Archive python client, and if you’re someone who wants to interact with the site as a power user (or were looking for an excuse to), it’ll help you to know about it too.

You might even be the kind of power user who is elbowing me out of the way saying “show me the code and show me the documentation”. Well, the documentation is here and the code is here. Have a great time.

Boy, they run fast.

So, for everyone still around, a little history about how this client came along and how, if you have a certain set of tasks and interactions you want to conduct with the massive treasures of archive.org, it might enable you to do some amazing things indeed. If you’ve never done command-line scripting before, here’s a great excuse to learn.

Started in 2012 and overseen primarily by Archive employee Jake Johnson, the internetarchive client (which is generally just called “ia”) is both a set of libraries and a command-line program for doing a wide range of activities and actions with the archive without having to come in through the website. There’s a range of advantages and differences from using the web interface, mostly that it can be called as a command-line request, and return the results (success, failure, other information) right into your scripts. It is coded to be in lock-step with our APIs and system, and does its best to respect capacity as well as return informative messages about success or errors.

The command comes in the form of ia [command], where command is a variety of functions:

  • It is possible to do a ia search command and return the item identifiers of every item that matches your query, which can then be fed to other scripts or utilitzed as a checklist for your own research.
  • The ia metadata command will return as much metadata as possible, including file sizes, metadata pairs, content type, and other useful information baked into every object in the collections.
  • The ia list command will tell you all the different files within an item identifier, to see which you might specifically want.
  • The ia download and ia upload commands let you pull down and upload items to the archive, setting all the attributes for uploads and adding conditions and specific matches for downloads.
  • The ia tasks command lets your scripts know how the addition of your items went into the archive’s sets, as well as where they stand in terms of post-processing.

All the commands, in fact, that a user might find themselves in desperate need of due to the size or complexity of the task, and clicking endlessly in a browser is just not going to cut it.

The client was originally created for the Archive to do many different processes itself, via scripts, that would both provide clear error messages, give accurate status updates, and allow the scripts to understand what was working or what needed modification. Many internal teams either use this client or depend on its output for information to do their tasks. With over six years of development on it, the tool is very mature and utilized thousands of times a day internally.

In my case, here are some automated or semi-automated tasks I use the ia client command set to do, often daily:

  • Analyze the text of a set of documents to provide me with best guesses as to their publication date, which I then sign off on
  • Take a donation of several hundred PDF files and turn them into individual items in a collection, including taking metadata from a .CSV sheet
  • Compare and contrast screenshots within an item to find the best one and make that a thumbnail for the item
  • Maintain “Pipelines” that pull from content located elsewhere (like the Bitsavers documentation project or the DNA Lounge) and place the resulting items into the Archive with no human intervention

For people who are using the Archive to simply play with and enjoy its many different materials, be they website histories, movies, music, and books – this tool is probably not what you need.

But for the scripting-comfortable folks.. for people who want to become scripting comfortable folks… for people who are maintaining collections or working hard with multiple uploads and doing a lot of manual work to enter metadata.. this multi-tool of Internet Archive access is exactly what you need.

As mentioned above, the documentation is here and the code is here. Have a great time.

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The Future of Canadian Copyright Looks Bright

Canada updated its copyright laws in 2012, with the mandate that the new provisions be reviewed in 5 years. Over the past 2 years the Canadian government has been studying the impacts of the law (the comments we submitted last December can be found here) and recently issued a very reasonable set of recommendations for modest improvements to the law.

Canadian scholar Michael Geist summarized the report better than we ever could here. His summary of the key takeaways are:

  • expansion of fair dealing by making the current list of fair dealing purposes illustrative rather than exhaustive (the “such as” approach)
  • rejection of new limits on educational fair dealing with further study in three years
  • retention of existing Internet safe harbour rules
  • rejection of the FairPlay site blocking proposal with insistence that any blocking include court oversight
  • expansion of the anti-circumvention rules by permitting circumvention of digital locks for purposes that are lawful (ie. permit circumvention to exercise fair dealing rights)
  • extend the term of copyright only if ratifying the USCMA and include a registration requirement for the additional 20 years implement
  • a new informational analysis exception
  • further study of statutory damages for all copyright collectives along with greater transparency
  • adoption of an open licence rather than the abolition of crown copyright

We are very pleased to see Canada moving towards more flexibility in their fair dealing regime, open licenses for government works, and registration requirements for longer terms and away from draconian site blocking and filtering proposals. We hope these reasonable recommendations will be followed by the Canadian Parliament.

Posted in Announcements, News | 7 Comments

Hamilton Public Library joins Open Libraries

In an effort to meet users’ growing needs around access to library materials, Hamilton Public Library has joined the Internet Archive’s Open Libraries program.

Hamilton Public Library’s Central Library, Hamilton, ON

“In today’s rapidly changing access to digital content, it is important that the broader library community works together to build lasting and growing collections of digital content for our customers and communities,” said Paul Takala, Chief Librarian and CEO of Hamilton Public Library. “The Internet Archive has developed a responsible and balanced controlled digital lending (CDL) model. I look forward to a future where all the unique titles we have in our collection – many of which are out of print – can be shared with researchers and learners everywhere. With the Internet Archive’s Open Libraries program, this future is now possible. I encourage all libraries to join this important effort.”

Internet Archive’s Open Libraries program uses controlled digital lending (CDL) to deliver nearly one million volumes of digitized texts to readers and researchers all over the world. Controlled digital lending is a process by which libraries can lend print books to patrons in digitized form, and has been described by copyright experts from major research libraries. Through CDL, libraries use controls to ensure an “owned-to-loaned” ratio, meaning the library circulates the exact number of copies of a specific title it owns, regardless of format, putting controls in place to prevent users from redistributing or copying the digitized version. CDL is not meant to replace existing licensing agreements for modern ebooks; instead, CDL helps libraries provide access to twentieth century publications that don’t have an electronic equivalent.

Participating in Open Libraries is easy.  After signing on to the program, libraries share their catalogs with Internet Archive and our engineers perform an overlap analysis to determine the physical books in a library’s collection that match the books we have digitized.  Where there’s a match, the Internet Archive returns links and catalog records to the digital book so that the library can include these in their catalog.

If your library is interested in learning more about the Open Libraries program, please consider joining one of our upcoming webinars:

Tuesday, June 18, 2019
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM CDT
Register for the free webinar

Wednesday, July 10, 2019
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM CDT
Register for the free webinar

Posted in Announcements, Books Archive, News, Open Library | 2 Comments

Have You Played Atari Today?

Guest blog post by Kevin Savetz

When I was a kid I fell in love with computers. Specifically, I fell in love with the Atari 800, one of the first microcomputers. I wanted to know everything about it: how it worked, how to program it, about the things you could do with it. I was hungry for information about that computer, about all computers, really. I read about them constantly. With every trip to the grocery store, I bugged my parents to buy me computer magazines. With every trip to the library, I headed straight to the Dewey 000s, the computer science section. I sent away for all the free information I could get, in the form of brochures and catalogs that came in the mail. I stored the reading material and the knowledge as long as I could.

Although it’s been more than a few years, that Atari computer remains one of my favorite things, as is finding information about it. So not much has changed there. What has changed is that I can use Internet Archive to share that information with other “retrocomputer” enthusiasts, historians, researchers, and students. The amount of information that’s been archived (by myself and many others) about this niche within a niche of computer history would have boggled kid me. Heck, it boggles adult me.

Here’s the first version of the operator’s manual for the Atari 800 computer, printed in 1979. Only 200 copies were printed. It includes photos of pre-production versions of the hardware and screenshots that don’t match what the released version of the computer would actually display. As a historical artifact, it gives insight into the process of creating a microcomputer and the decisions that the hardware and software engineers were working though. It’s easy to open a couple of windows to do a side-by-side comparison with the more common released version, from later that same year, which trades some of the quaintness for accuracy.

You can also delve into development notebooks and design documents, which can provide unique perspective into how hardware and software was built. Joe Decuir, one of the designers of the Atari 800, saved his engineering notebooks from his time at Atari, and allowed me to scan them. His 1977 and 1978 engineering notebook include design concepts down to the chip level, feasibility studies, meeting notes, and teardowns of competing products.

Atari game programmer Gray Chang lent me his handwritten development notebook for his computer game Claim Jumper, which was published by Synapse Software in 1982. I was able to scan the notebook and upload it to Internet Archive. Claim Jumper is an adorable game about collecting gold nuggets in the Old West. The notebook, complete with painstakingly crafted programming code, flowcharts, hand-drawn graphics, and a handwritten draft of the manual, is a reminder of a time when one person could single-handedly create every aspect of a computer game. Many of today’s games are built by teams of dozens or hundreds of coders, artists, musicians, and writers. Gray’s notebook is testament to the fact once upon a time, it took a team of one to create a great video game.

If poring over old scribbled notebooks doesn’t whet your appetite for the history of old computers, perhaps a movie featuring children falling in love with them will. “The Magic Room” is a movie about Atari computer camps: summer computer camps for kids. Shot in 1982, the film was commissioned by Atari as a sort of documentary, sort of extended advertisement for its camp program. The title cards were made, naturally, on Atari computers. The kids are stunning in their pre-teen awkwardness. There are scenes of children riding horses at golden hour, playing basketball, and of course engaged with their Atari computers. Very little game playing is shown. These kids are programming, solving problems, thinking, and learning.

In fact, everything produced for Atari Computer Camp is hosted at Internet Archive. The application, the acceptance letter, the entire curriculum of programming classes, the instructor guide, and all the software that was available to campers. Everything. It’s far too late to attend an Atari summer camp but, using Internet Archive, you can read and do everything that those campers could do. (Except the horses and basketball.)

There’s more, of course, probably even enough information about Atari computers to keep kid-me satisfied. A curated “best of” selection of Atari-related material is in the Archive’s Atari Historical Documents collection. The Atari Computer Books collection has scans of 300 books, definitely more than my hometown library’s 000 shelf. And there’s entire runs of old computer magazines, all readable and searchable in your browser.

I’m grateful to Internet Archive for allowing me to share my passion for these computers by sharing the documents that I find with the rest of the world. And I’m grateful that the retrocomputing nerds in the rest of the world can use Internet Archive to share what they find with me.

===

Kevin Savetz (twitter, Internet Archive) is an Atari historian and podcaster. He is co-host of Antic: The Atari 8-Bit Podcast, where he has published more than 350 oral history interviews with people involved with the early home computer industry; and Eaten By A Grue, a podcast about Infocom text adventure games.

Posted in Announcements, News | 22 Comments

Spark New Ideas & Technologies at DWeb Camp 2019

You’re Invited to the DWeb Camp 2019

On July 18-21th, the Internet Archive is convening a special gathering around decentralized technologies and principles for a more open, private, secure Web. Builders and Dreamers: join us for a meaningful long weekend to explore concepts of decentralization and community at DWeb Camp 2019.

Benedict Lau of Toronto Mesh demonstrates how IPFS and Secure Scuttlebutt work on a mesh network of Raspberry Pis. Looking on: AlterMundi’s Nicolas Pace and Protocol Labs’ Juan Benet.

Hands-on hacking, workshops, deep conversation & creativity

Participants emulate the Decentralized Web itself in a creative exploration led by Taeyoon Choi of the School for Poetic Computation at the Decentralized Web Summit 2018.

Based on communal principles, most of the weekend’s programming will be community-created and  self-organized. There will be hacking, lightning talks, workshops and celebrations through music and art! So propose an activation, conversation, or project to share.

Space to experiment

Share your skills in myriad hands-on workshops.

The Camp includes a 10,000 square foot hacker space for building decentralized infrastructure and community-first dapps. The farm will be wired with a mesh network to experiment with off-line tech. Come build interesting applications for decentralization around: identity, file-sharing, local mesh networks, databases, mapping, and social media.

UX/UI breakout group including Sir Tim Berners-Lee, founder the World Wide Web at DWeb Summit 2018.

Swap Ideas with thought leaders

At DWeb Camp, we’re honored to be joined by thought leaders from many communities: Internet Archive, Handshake, Coil, Mozilla, W3C, Matrix, Holo, IPFS/Protocol Labs, Beaker Browser, Web Torrent, Web 3 Foundation, Jolocom, Bloom, Scuttlebutt, People’s Open Project, Toronto Mesh, Wolk, Aether, Earth Species Project, and more. Here is a partial look at who is coming.

Camp in Comfort

Need a tent? You can rent a 5 meter canvas tent complete with mattresses, comforters and linens.

We will be camping on a private farm surrounded by 700 acres of pristine coastal land with miles of beaches, forests, and streams. And no one said camping couldn’t be comfortable. The farm comes with toilets, showers, parking for RVs, plus 3 healthy meals per day included with your ticket.

From Open Space to WellnessWorkshops

As it is at Burning Man, participants should bring their talents and gifts to share. Some the projects and workshops offered by the community include:

Members of the Farm will lead us in mushroom inoculation workshops where you can learn to grow your own edible mushrooms.
  • Anti-surveillance technologies
  • Decentralized identity
  • Decentralized virtual reality
  • Decentralized archiving
  • Data swaps
  • Building mesh networks
  • Decentralized media storage
  • Mushroom inoculation
  • Permaculture & regenerative agriculture
  • Mobile renewable energy
  • Whatever you’d like to share! (Let us know here if you want to lead a workshop or give a lightning talk on any subject

Join us for a mind-expanding and heart warming weekend!

Register Here


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71,716 video tapes in 12,094 days

On November 4, 1979 Marion Stokes began systematically video taping television news and continued for more than 33 years, until the day she died. The Internet Archive is now home to the unique 71k+ video cassette collection and is endeavoring to help make sure it is digitized and made available online to everyone, forever, for free.

Ms. Stokes was a fiercely private African American social justice champion, librarian, political radical, TV producer, feminist, Apple Computer super-fan and collector like few others. Her life and idiosyncratic passions are sensitively explored in the exceedingly well reviewed new documentary, Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project, by Matt Wolf. Having premiered last month at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival, the film is on tour and will be featured at San Francisco’s Indefest, June 8th & 10th. For those in the Bay Area, please consider joining Internet Archive staff and leadership at the 7:00pm June 10th screening. Advance tickets are available now, seating is limited.

Long before many questioned the media’s motivations and recognized the insidious intentional spread of disinformation, Ms. Stokes was alarmed. In a private herculean effort, she took on the challenge of independently preserving the news record of her times in its most pervasive and persuasive form – TV.

Background Materials, Resources & Reviews

Input
Marion Stokes and her future husband John Stokes appear in and helped produce Input, a weekly panel discussion series on the CBS affiliate in Philadelphia that ran from 1968 through early 1971. It addressed a remarkable range of timely social topics, some far ahead of their time.  Panelists included diverse thoughtful scholars, activists, clergy and others.  Some had already made recognized accomplishments. And some would only later make their profound contributions to civil rights and social justice.

Pete Seeger was already a well known political folk singer when he appeared in February 1970 on a panel with a prison warden and recently released inmates discussing the nature of incarceration and criminal justice reform. Here he is sharing his song “Walking Down Death Row” on the program.

John Fryer was a Philadelphia psychiatrist. Here he is on Input in January 1968 discussing contradictory social norms. Five years later, Dr. Fryer would give a speech, in disguise, at the American Psychiatric Association annual convention. Introduced as Dr. Anonymous, he announced “I am a homosexual. I am a psychiatrist. I am a member of the APA,”  He went on to decry the prejudice directed toward gay people by the Association and social institutions.  Dr. Fryer’s brave and bold call for reform is credited as galvanizing his peers in 1973 to remove homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

William Davidon was professor of Physics at Haverford College. Here he is in a December 1968 Input episode, discussing the nature of television as a means of manipulating an uninformed public. 27 months later he would take an action of great social consequence and his role would remain secret for the next 43 years. In 2014, the book The Burglary posthumously revealed Dr. Davidon as the leader of a group that in 1971 broke into the FBI field office in Media, PA. They were never caught. The 8-member team stole, and released to the press, an enormous trove of documents that revealed COINTELPRO. It was the FBI’s then 15-year long covert, and often illegal, domestic surveillance program to disrupt, discredit and destroy American civil rights, anti-war and other social activist organizations and leaders.  Included in the documents was evidence of the FBI’s attempt to induce, via blackmail, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to commit suicide. The release of the papers lead to significant additional revelations by journalists and Congressional investigations, which prompted substantial reform.

Personal Journals
Ms. Stokes was a committed diarist, note taker and list maker. Under the leadership of archivist Jackie Jay, The Internet Archive has been digitizing the contents of 55 bankers boxes of her papers that include her personal journals, magazines, newspapers, civic organization pamphlets, leaflets and handbills. Some of her earliest (1960 & 1961) hand-written journal entries are now publicly available and can be viewed here. More will be added as they are scanned and QC’d.

Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project” Documentary Reviews & Press

Matt Wolf’s remarkable Recorder uses Stokes’ recording obsession as a way to explore both Stokes herself and the world she literally committed to video tape. The results are fascinating, weird, and often quite moving.” – Indiewire

Intriguing from first minute to last… Relating this stranger-than-fiction tale with the narrative twists and turns of a well-paced thriller, Recorder will make news junkies feel a lot better about themselves.” – Hollywood Reporter

One outstanding offering in this year’s Tribeca Film Festival is Recorder, which reveals the secret greatness of a reclusive activist… An information revolutionary, Stokes, despite her decades of isolation, touched the nerve center of the times.” – The New Yorker

Recorder is more than just a portrait of a woman’s complicated relationships and obsessions… Recorder quietly seeds damning observations about the ways media narratives are formed, and how the shapers of these narratives distort the truth and our worldview.” – Flixist

Stokes’s archival work is unprecedented; a time machine back to the advent of the 24-hour news cycle covering historical and cultural events that otherwise would have been overlooked” – The Outline

But Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project is not just — or even predominantly — an essay film about the media. What makes the documentary so fascinating is the parallel it draws between restoring an archive and retrieving a life.” – Filmmaker Magazine

…rarely do we experience the passion and purpose of a methodical collector, who really made a difference. Matt Wolf’s masterful documentary, Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project takes us into the visionary psychic and cluttered physical worlds of a woman who turned her acquiring fury into a unique archive of contemporary history.” – Helen Highly

But maybe the real value of the Marion Stokes Project is that starting close to 20 years before the digital age, it reveals how the news was going to evolve into an addiction, one that had the power to displace whatever subject it was ostensibly about. For even if you’re obsessed with the inaccuracy of TV news, it has still entrapped you, like a two-way mirror that won’t let you see the other side.” – Variety

The story of Marion Stokes inspires and challenges us to consider our world and the legacy we can create through dedication to our own ideals and principals.” – 2019 Maryland Film Festival

Recorder: The Marion Stokes Projectmanages to capsulize Stokes’ efforts and present them as a springboard for a greater conversation on the societal effects of the media, and what we can accomplish given the right resources and individual determination.” – Film Threat

Data, it is said, is the new oil. A woman named Marion Stokes knew this early on and believed that freedom was inextricably linked to data and facts because with it one can make informed decisions. So she took what is seen as a curious and radical approach to feverishly create massive archives of what used to be the prime source of such data, television news, in a time when no one else would.“ – Forbes

This story is beautifully told, inspiring, and is a constant reminder that everything we hear is not always the whole truth.” – Irish Film Critic

Much like Stokes’ archives, Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project is a cautionary reminder that, now more than ever, we need to be scrutinizing who is shaping the breaking news we consume.Cinema Axis

Marion had fought a quixotic but worthy battle against the tyranny of transience.” – New Statesman

The first ( November 2013) press article on the Marion Stokes TV Archive [note: early estimates of collection size were off by a factor of 2]
The Incredible Story Of Marion Stokes, Who Single-Handedly Taped 35 Years Of TV News – Sarah Kessler


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