Pineapple Fund Gifts $1M in Bitcoin to the Internet Archive!

Thank you Pineapple Fund

This year, Christmas came early to the Internet Archive. On Saturday, the generous philanthropist behind the Pineapple Fund gave $1 million dollars in Bitcoin to the Internet Archive. This anonymous crypto-philanthropist explains, “I saw the promise of decentralized money and decided to mine/buy/trade some magical internet tokens. …Donating most of it to charity is what I’m doing.” We so admire this donor using Bitcoin as the currency of giving this season, and are honored to be the recipients of such a gift. Whoever you are, you are doing a world of good. Thank you.

Permanent access to websites, software, books, music…that is our mission. These gifts help make it happen.

It is especially gratifying to see those who dreamed big about Bitcoin using their wealth to support innovation across the world. The Internet Archive has been actively involved in this community since 2011. Encouraged, we are dreaming big and dreaming open.

Thank you to Pineapple Fund and thank you to the thousands that have contributed already.

Please consider donating this year— it really helps. Looking forward to 2018!

More information about the Pineapple Fund:
Original Reddit Post
Reddit Post Update
Pineapple Fund Interview with Hacker Noon
Pineapple Fund Interview with Bitcoin Magazine

Posted in Announcements, News | 20 Comments

TV News Record: Face-o-Matic on Trump, McConnell, and Pelosi; PolitiFact picks “2017 Lie of the Year”

A biweekly round up on what’s happening at the TV News Archive by Katie Dahl and Nancy Watzman.

This week we take a dive into nearly six months of Face-o-Matic facial recognition data. We also display the news clips behind PolitiFact’s top picks for lies and misstatements of the year, most of them seen and heard on TV news.

Face-o-Matic reveals cable news persistent patterns

With nearly six-months of data available, we’re finding certain persistent patterns on how cable networks make editorial choices in displaying the faces of President Donald Trump and top congressional leaders on TV screens.

First, Trump trumps the congressional leaders for on-screen face time, by many degrees of magnitude.

 

Second, of the four congressional leaders, Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R., Ky., gets the most face-time on TV, and MSNBC features his visage more than the other networks examined. Fox News features the face of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D., Calif. more than any other cable network.

Face-o-Matic, an experimental service, developed in collaboration with the start-up Matroid, tracks the faces of selected high level elected officials on major TV cable news channels: CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and the BBC.  Face-o-Matic data is available to the media, researchers, and the public, updated daily here. Stay tuned: we are in the process of testing new faces to add to Face-o-Matic: living past presidents and recent major political party nominees.

PolitiFact announces “2017 Lie of the Year”

Our fact-checking partner PolitiFact has announced its annual Lie of the Year: President Donald Trump’s statement in May 2017 to NBC’s Lester Holt, “This Russia thing…is a made-up story.” Below is the interview on the Internet Archive’s TV News Archive.

Writes PolitiFact editor, Angie Drobnic Holan:

In both classified and public reports, U.S. intelligence agencies have said Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered actions to interfere with the election. Those actions included the cyber-theft of private data, the placement of propaganda against particular candidates, and an overall effort to undermine public faith in the U.S. democratic process.

Trump’s statement about Russia was both the PolitiFact’s editors pick for Lie of the Year, and the top one chosen by PolitiFact’s readers in an online poll by “an overwhelming margin.” Readers also called out other fact-checks to highlight for the year, choosing from a list of ten from the editors, or writing in their own nominations.

The top vote-getter after Trump’s statement on Russia was Idaho Republican Rep. Raul Labrador’s claim that “Nobody dies because they don’t have access to health care.” “While the exact number of deaths saved by having health insurance is uncertain, the researchers we contacted agreed that the number is higher than zero–probably quite a bit higher,” writes PolitiFact reporter Louis Jacobson, who rated the claim “Pants on Fire.”

In third place was Sean Spicer’s claim, “that was the largest audience to witness an inauguration, period,” referring to the presidential inauguration in January 2017. PolitiFact at the time rated that claim “Pants on Fire”: “Spicer suggested 720,000 attended Trump’s inauguration, while organizers said they expected 700,000 to 900,000, and Trump himself estimated 1.5 million. All of those figures are less than the 1.8 million people who attended Obama’s 2009 inaugural.”

To see more video of fact-checks chosen by PolitiFact’s readers and editors as lies or misstatements of the year, see this list, which includes links both to TV news clips of public officals making statements on the air, along with links to fact-checks of those statements.

Follow us @tvnewsarchive, and subscribe to our biweekly newsletter here.

 

 

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Dreaming Open, Dreaming Big

Disheartened by anti-NetNeutrality moves in the US, but inspired by the reddit poster offering to donate $87million in bitcoin (5057BTC) to good causes (including the awesome EFF)?

It got us dreaming open and dreaming big: What could we do if the open world had lots of money, and specifically what could the Internet Archive do with it?

$100m (5930 BTC)
Bring 4 million books to billions of people and improve the quality of information on the internet for everyone.

 


$7m (415 BTC)

Rebuild the building next to ours to house interns, fellows, and researchers to create the next generation of open.

 


$12m (711 BTC)

Bring a million songs from the 78rpm era to the internet by fueling the Great 78 Project.

 

 

$5m (296 BTC)
Digitize and preserve the sound archives of the Boston Public Library, 250,000 discs (LP’s, 78’s, and CD’s), to make a public library of music for all.

 

 

$52.5M (3113 BTC)
Preserve and keep available our existing 35 petabytes of data forever. Based on a study by David Rosenthal of LOCKSS project at Stanford University, the forever cost of storing a terabyte is $1500 USD. Just long term preservation of the 200TB of US government information from the end of the last administration is $300k (17 BTC).

$15m (889 BTC)
Pay all Internet Archive employees with bitcoin for 2018.

 

 

physical archive$10m (593 BTC)
Buy the next building to store the millions of books records and films being donated to the Internet Archive. We are now filling up our current two buildings.

 

 


$4m (237 BTC)

Launch the Decentralized Web as a project to build a more private, reliable, and flexible web.

 

In fact, we are working towards all of these projects. But they can go much faster with donations and interest on the part of you, our Internet Archive supporters. Contributions of all sizes make a huge difference. The average donation this year is about $20. Together we can build a robust open world.

Posted in Announcements, News | 2 Comments

TV News Record: Coverage of sexual harassment charges

A biweekly round up on what’s happening at the TV News Archive by Katie Dahl and Nancy Watzman.

This week we dive into research resources, fact-checks, and backgrounders on the sexual harassment charges sweeping the worlds of media, politics, and entertainment.

Past TV news appearances by O’Reilly, Franken, Halperin & more preserved, searchable

The names of well-known and influential men accused of sexual harassment continue to pile up: Louis C.K.; Rep. John Conyers, D., Mich.; Sen. Al Franken, D., Minn.; Mark Halperin of ABC; Garrison Keillor of Prairie Home Companion fame; NBC’s Matt Lauer, Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore; Fox’s Bill O’Reilly; Charlie Rose of CBS and PBS; Leon Wieseltier, formerly of The New Republic; Harvey Weinstein, and of course the president himself, Donald Trump.

Some of these men made their living on TV and all of them have many TV appearances preserved in the TV News Archive. These include, for example, clips making the rounds in this week’s stories about Lauer’s television history: this one where NBC staff did a fake joke story about Lauer himself being harassed by a colleague; and this interview with the actress Anne Hathaway after a photographer took a photo up her skirt and a tabloid printed it.

We’ve also got this September 2017  interview Lauer did of Bill O’Reilly, in which he asks the former Fox News host: “Have you done some soul searching? Have you done some self-reflection and have you looked at the way you treated women that you think now or think about differently now than you did at the time?” O’Reilly answers, “My conscience is clear.”


TV news use of term “sexual harassment” peaked in 2011

Mentions of term “sexual harassment” since 2009 on cableTV news shows, source: Television Explorer search of TV News Archive caption data

Cable TV news programs mentions of the term “sexual harassment” are picking up, but not yet at the level they were back in November 2011, according to a search of TV News Archive caption data via Television Explorer. What was big news then? Accusations of sexual harassment against then presidential candidate Herman Cain, who the following month dropped out of the 2012 race. Cain was back on TV this week, in an interview on the current claims of sexual harassment against powerful men, on Fox News’ The Ingraham Angle.

Cain says: “Now, what’s different about my situation, and let’s just say Roy Moore’s situation, is that they came after me with repeatedly attacks and accusations, but no confirmation. They now believe that if they throw more and more and more mud on the wall, that eventually people are going to believe it. But that has backfired because, as you know, the latest poll shows Roy Moore is now back in the lead in Alabama, and the people in Alabama are going to have to decide.”


Fact-checks and backgrounders on sexual harassment charges

Our fact-checking partners have produced numerous fact-checks and background pieces on sexual harassment charges and statements.

“How politicians react to such charges often appears to reflect who is being accused. Democrats are quick to jump on allegations about Republicans — and vice versa. But the bets start to get hedged when someone in the same party falls under scrutiny,” writes Meg Kelly for The Washington Post‘s Fact Checker.

For example, here’s House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D. Calif., on “Meet the Press” in 1998, defending then-President Bill Clinton. At the time, Pelosi said, referring to the investigation by Ken Starr into allegations against Clinton: “The women of America are just like other Americans, in that they value fairness, they value privacy, and do not want to see a person with uncontrolled power, uncontrolled time, uncontrolled – unlimited money investigating the president of the United States.”

And here’s President Donald Trump on the White House south lawn, defending GOP Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore: “Roy Moore denies this. That’s all I can say. And by the way, he totally denies it.”

Kelly also wrote a round-up of sexual harassment charges against the president himself: “During the second presidential debate, Anderson Cooper asked then-candidate Trump point blank whether he had “actually kiss[ed] women without consent or grope[d] women without consent?” Trump asserted that “nobody has more respect for women” and Cooper pushed him, asking, “Have you ever done those things?” Trump denied that he had, responding: “No, I have not.”…But it’s not as simple as that. Many of the women have produced witnesses who say they heard about these incidents when they happened — long before Trump’s political aspirations were known. Three have produced at least two witnesses.”

In another piece, Glenn Kessler, editor of The Washington Post’s Fact Checker, writes  in a round up of corroborators, “Such contemporaneous accounts are essential to establishing the credibility of the allegation because they reduce the chances that a person is making up a story for political purposes. In the case of sexual allegations, such accounts can help bolster the credibility of the “she said” side of the equation.” One of the statements of denial he quotes is this one from White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who says when asked if all of the accusers are lying: “Yeah, we’ve been clear on that from the beginning, and the president’s spoken on it.”


Here’s FactCheck.org’s Eugene Kiely on Sen. Tim Kaine, D., Va., and his claim that the Clinton campaign can’t give back contributions from Harry Weinstein: “Asked if the Clinton-Kaine campaign will return contributions it received from movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, Sen. Tim Kaine repeatedly said the campaign is over. That’s true, but it doesn’t mean the campaign can’t refund donations.” FactCheck.org deemed this claim “misleading.”

Follow us @tvnewsarchive, and subscribe to our biweekly newsletter here.

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Why I Work for the Internet Archive

Wendy Hanamura, Director of Partnerships

This year something magical happened.

Our film curator, Rick Prelinger, noticed a film for sale on eBay. The description said “taken at a Japanese Internment Camp,” so Rick bought it, suspecting it might be of historical significance. In October, when he digitized the 16mm reel and showed it to me, I couldn’t believe it.  

On the screen was a home movie shot in 1944 at the WWII camp in Jerome, Arkansas where 8,500 Japanese Americans were incarcerated. This American concentration camp was once the fifth largest town in Arkansas. Rick thinks the film was shot by a camp administrator and hidden away for the last 73 years.

There are only a handful of movies ever shot inside the camps—I know, because my mother and grandparents were locked up in a similar camp for three and a half years.

Sab Masada at the Internet Archive, October 2017

What a miracle, then, that the Internet Archive found this film and preserved it while there are still people who can bear witness to what we see on screen. One of them, Sab Masada, was 12 years old when a truck came to haul his family away from their farm in Fresno. At our annual event, Sab remembered:

We were shipped to Jerome, Arkansas. It turned extremely cold, the beginning of November. In fact, we had some snow. The camp was still being completed so our barracks had no heat and my father caught pneumonia. 21 days after we arrived, he died in a makeshift barrack hospital…

This film will tell America that these concentration camps we were in—it wasn’t a myth! They were real. So it’s a historical record: proof of what really happened to 120,000 Americans and legal residents.

The best part for me?  That this film will live on at archive.org, accessible to the public, forever, for free.  Filmmakers can download it. Scholars can study it.  Teachers can weave it into their lessons.

Educator, Andi Wong, teaching the lessons of Japanese American incarceration at Rooftop School in San Francisco.

Here’s our promise to you: the Internet Archive will keep updating these files every time a major, new format emerges. We will preserve them for the long term, against fire, neglect and all types of more human disaster. We will cherish your stories as if they were our own.  

I’m part of a small staff of 150, running a site the whole world depends on. I’ve worked at huge media corporations where the only things that matter are the ratings, because ratings = profits. At the end of the day, I couldn’t stomach it. I wanted to do more. I wanted to work at a place aligned with my values: creating a world where everyone has equal access to knowledge, because knowledge equals power. It’s society’s great leveler—at least that’s how it worked for my family. 

This is why I give to the Internet Archive:  because I believe every story deserves to be saved for the future.   

When you give, you’re helping make sure the whole world can access the books, concerts, radio shows, web pages and yes, the home movies, that tell our human story.

So please, support our mission by donating today. Right now, a very generous supporter will match your donation 3-to-1, so you can triple your impact.

Think of it as an investment in our children, and their children, so that one day in the future, they might understand our joys and learn from our mistakes.

Wendy Hanamura, Director of Partnerships, Internet Archive

Posted in Announcements, News | 16 Comments

5,000 78rpm sides for the Great 78 Project are now posted

From the David Chomowicz and Esther Ready Collection.
Click to listen.

This month’s transfers of 5,000 78rpm sides for the Great 78 Project are now posted.

Many are Latin American music from the David Chomowicz and Esther Ready Collection.

Others are square dance music, with and without the calls, from the Larry Edelman Collection. (Thank you David Chomowicz, Esther Ready, and Larry Edelman for the donations.)

We are still working on some of the display issues with this month’s materials, so some changes are yet to come.

From the Larry Edelman Collection.
Click to listen.

Unfortunately we have only found dates for about 1/2 of this month’s batch using our automatic techniques of looking through 78disography.com, 45worlds, discogs, DAHR, and full text searching of Cashbox Magazine.  There are currently over 2,000 songs with missing dates.

If you like internet sleuthing, or leveraging our scanned discographies or your discographies and would like to join in on finding dates and reviews, please jump in. We have a slack channel of those doing this.

Congratulations to B George’s group, George Blood’s group, and the collections group at the Internet Archive for another large batch of largely disappeared 78’s.

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Net Neutrality & Competition: The Final Days of Internet Freedom


Join Public Knowledge to Discuss…

Net neutrality is on the chopping block. Public Knowledge has spent nearly ten years fighting for an open internet, but we expect that at the Federal Communications Commission’s December 14th meeting a majority of Commissioners will vote to eliminate our strong net neutrality rules. The current FCC has made dominant industry interests a priority, putting startup and consumer interests at risk. As one of the world’s largest centers for businesses and individuals financing, creating, and building the technology and inputs to the digital economy, Silicon Valley will be directly impacted by these new policies. At the same time, AT&T is seeking to merge with Time Warner, and Sinclair Broadcasting with the Tribune Company — potentially undermining video and broadband competition as net neutrality rules disappear. So, Public Knowledge is coming to California to discuss these important political shifts with engaged individuals, and to build new connections with individuals who want to learn more about standing up for an open internet.

Panelists for the discussion will include: Chris Lewis (Vice President, Public Knowledge), Evan Engstrom (Executive Director, Engine), Otessa Marie Ghadar (Professor, Director of DC Web Fest, Digital Content Creator & Advocate), Ernesto Falcon (Legislative Counsel, Electronic Frontier Foundation), and Brandi Collins (Senior Campaign Director; Media, Democracy, & Economic Justice, Color of Change).

The event will kick off with a reception from 6-7pm and will include a discussion from 7-8pm. We hope that you will join us and stick around afterwards for food and drinks until 9pm.

Please be sure to register, spread the word via Twitter, and keep an eye out for additional information coming soon.

GET TICKETS HERE

Tuesday December 5th, 2017
6:00 pm Reception
7:00 pm Program
8:00 pm Reception

Internet Archive
300 Funston Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Posted in Event | 9 Comments

Wondering what to do with your Cryptocurrency Windfall? Donations accepted here!

This week, as you’ve watched your Bitcoin Cash and Bitcoin rise and fall and rise again, perhaps you’ve been wondering:  how can I put my cryptocurrencies to good use?  Should I buy a new car or yacht?  Plow it into Amazon stock?  Well, at least some of you have turned to the Internet Archive—a place where you can donate your cryptocurrencies directly to help ensure that the Web is free, secure and backed up for all time.

At the Internet Archive, we are big fans of the cryptocurrency movement and have been trying to do our part to test and support alternative means of commerce. We’ve been accepting Bitcoin donations since 2012, and starting this week, we are now accepting donations of Bitcoin Cash and Zcash.

This week it all started when UKcryptocurrency tweeted us asking the Internet Archive to start accepting Bitcoin Cash. We love a good challenge and got that link up within hours.

UKcurrency tweet

Here’s how you can donate in cryptocurrency:


Bitcoin is an experimental, cryptographically secure, semi-anonymous method of transferring value between parties. Introduced in 2008, it has been successfully used as a token system between thousands of people. The Internet Archive has proudly experimented with bitcoin including paying some employees with it and encouraging local businesses to experiment as well.
Internet Archive Bitcoin Address: 1Archive1n2C579dMsAu3iC6tWzuQJz8dN


When Bitcoin was first created, developers and miners questioned whether the cryptocurrency could scale properly. To ensure its future, on August 1, 2017, developers and miners initiated what’s known as a ‘hard fork’ and created a new currency called Bitcoin Cash. For more information, visit: https://www.bitcoincash.org/
Internet Archive Bitcoin Cash Address: 12PRZjrLo5yqnHMmUCtPUse4kCyuneby3S


Zcash is the first-of-its-kind cryptocurrency that offers both privacy and selective transparency for all transactions. Zcash gives you the option of using a transparent addresses (what the Internet Archive uses, listed below) or shielded addresses which keep sender, receiver, and amounts private. For more information on Zcash visit https://z.cash/, and for details on the differences between transparent and shielded transactions visit: https://z.cash/support/security/privacy-security-recommendations.html
Internet Archive Zcash Address: t1W6JqMECmbqmDGZ9uLSXWQZ6EgxFkfuty8

We are a non-profit organization with a huge mission: to give everyone access to all knowledge—the books, web pages, audio, television and software of our shared humanity. Forever. For Free. But to build this digital library of the future, we need your help. If you’re feeling flush from a cryptocurrency-windfall, please consider giving to the Internet Archive today.

More info on why cryptocurrencies matter to us: http://blog.archive.org/2017/09/02/why-bitcoin-is-on-the-internet-archives-balance-sheet/

Posted in Announcements, News | 12 Comments

TV News Record: Whoops, they said it again (on taxes)

A biweekly round up on what’s happening at the TV News Archive by Katie Dahl and Nancy Watzman

This week, we demonstrate GOP and Democrat talking points on taxes; display a case of mistaken facial identity; and present fact checks on the GOP tax proposal.

Whoops, they said it again

Was that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D., Calif., who said “tax cuts for the rich”? Or was that Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D., N.Y.? Wait: they both said it. Often.

Meanwhile, House Speaker Paul Ryan, R., Wis., keeps talking about tax reform being a “once in a generation opportunity,” and, coincidence!, so does Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R., Ky. It’s a recurring theme.

These types of repeated phrases, often vetted via communication staff, are known as “talking points,” and it’s the way politicians, lobbyists, and other denizens of the nation’s capital sell policy. The TV News Archive is working toward the goal of applying artificial intelligence (AI) to our free, online library of TV news to help ferret out talking points so we can better understand how political messages are crafted and disseminated.

For now, we don’t have an automated way to identify such repeated phrases from the thousands of hours of television news coverage. However, searching within our curated archives of top political leaders can provide a quick way to check for a phrase you think you’re hearing often. Visit archive.org/tv to find our Trump archive, executive branch archive, and congressional archives, click into an archive, then search for the phrase within that archive.

Sample search results in the congressional archive

Funny, you look familiar

Wait, is this former President George W. Bush trying out a new look?

No, it’s not. This is Bob Massi, a legal analyst for Fox Business News and host of “Bob Massi is the Property Man.”  In a test run of new faces for our Face-o-Matic facial detection tool, Massi’s uncanny resemblance (minus the hair) to the former president earned him a “false positive” – the algorithm identified this appearance as Bush incorrectly.

This doesn’t get us too worried, as we still include human testers and editors in our secret sauce: we’ll retrain our algorithm to disregard photos of Massi in the TV news stream. It does point toward why we want to be very careful, particularly with facial recognition, where a private individual may be tracked inadvertently or a public official misrepresented. Our concern about developing ethical practices with facial recognition is why, for the present, we are restricting our face-finding to elected officials. We invite discussion with the greater community about ethical practices in applying AI to the TV News Archive at tvnews@archive.org.

In our current Face-o-Matic set we track the faces of President Donald Trump and the four congressional leaders in their TV news appearances. After receiving feedback from journalists and researchers, our next set will include living ex-presidents and recent major presidential party nominees: Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush,  Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, John McCain, and Mitt Romney. Stay tuned, while we fine tune our model.

Fact-check: everyone will get a tax cut (false)

In an interview on November 7, on Fox News’s new “The Ingraham Angle,” House Speaker Paul Ryan, R., Wis., says: “Everyone enjoys a tax cut all across the board.”

Pulling in information from the Tax Policy Center and a tax model created by the American Enterprise Institute, The Washington Post’s Fact Checker Glenn Kessler counters Ryan’s claim: “In the case of married families with children — whom Republicans are assiduously wooing as beneficiaries of their plan — about 40 percent are estimated to receive tax hikes by 2027, even if the provisions are retained.”

Ryan changed his language, according to Kessler, following an inquiry on November 8 from the Fact Checker. Now he is saying, “the average taxpayer in all income levels gets a tax cut.”

Fact-check: tax bill not being scored by CBO as is tradition (false)

In an interview on November 12 on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin, D., Ill., claimed that the GOP tax plan is “not being scored by the Congressional Budget Office, as it is traditionally. It’s because it doesn’t add up.”

“Under the most obvious interpretation of that statement, Durbin is incorrect. The nonpartisan analysis for tax bills is actually a task handled by the Joint Committee on Taxation, and the committee has been actively analyzing the Republican tax bills,” reported Louis Jacobson of PolitiFact.

Follow us @tvnewsarchive, and subscribe to our biweekly newsletter here.

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Hewlett Foundation Commissions New Work by DJ Spooky & Internet Archive

We are honored to announce that the Internet Archive and artists Paul D. Miller (aka DJ Spooky) and Greg Niemeyer have been awarded one of the first Hewlett 50 Art Commissions to support the creation of “Sonic Web”—an acoustic portrait of the Internet.  Sampling from the millions of hours of audio preserved in the Internet Archive, these experimental composers and artists will collaborate to create an 11-movement multimedia production for a string quartet, vocalist and original electronic instruments about the origins of the Internet and what needs to happen to keep it accessible, neutral, and free.

“Art is always a reflection of the changing dynamics of any society. Leonardo Da Vinci once said ‘Learning never exhausts the mind,'” explained DJ Spooky. “I think that we have so many things to learn from these kinds of interdisciplinary projects, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation is collaborating with Artists to show how these initiatives can affect the entire spectrum of the creative economy.”

The Internet Archive team is among the first 10 recipients of the Hewlett 50 Arts Commissions, an $8 million commissioning initiative that is the largest of its kind in the United States.  These $150,000 grants support Bay Area nonprofits working with world-class artists on major new music compositions spanning myriad genres including chamber, electronic, jazz, opera, and hip hop. These commissions honor the Hewlett Foundation’s 50th anniversary, commemorating decades of leadership in the Bay Area arts world.

“The Hewlett 50 Arts Commissions are a symbol of the foundation’s longstanding commitment to performing arts in the Bay Area,” said Larry Kramer, president of the Hewlett Foundation. “We believe the awards will fund the creation of new musical works of lasting significance that are as dynamic and diverse as the Bay Area communities where they will premiere.”

New media artist and UC Berkeley arts practice associate professor, Greg Niemeyer, presenting his new work, “Memory Palace,” at the Internet Archive in 2016.

“Sonic Web” is conceived to push boundaries in both music and technology.  New media artist, Greg Niemeyer, will build an original Sonic Web Instrument —a large touchscreen with a software tool to draw network diagrams. It will enable DJ Spooky to build and take apart simple networks using sampled sounds from the Internet Archive, further layered by a vocalist and string quartet.

“Sonic Web will dig into the big crate of the Internet Archive and remix internet history in a new, networked way,” says Greg Niemeyer.  “We will break out of linear musical structures towards a more networked and connected sound.”

 

The artists will also take these tools on the road, partnering with Berkeley Center for New Media, Stanford Live, Youth Radio, and Bay Area high schools for music and technology workshops and a service learning course at UC Berkeley.

The work will premiere at the Internet Archive Great Room during the summer of 2018.  We will also provide  free global access to a downloadable Sonic Web album with music videos and the livestream of the premiere  at archive.org.

NOTE: DJ Spooky, Niemeyer and the Internet Archive collaborated in 2016 to create “Memory Palace,” a new multimedia work performed at our own 20th anniversary celebration. For a taste of what’s to come, watch this.

 

 

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