Soundwave 8 Biennial Festival at the Internet Archive: XUXA SANTAMARIA

We are excited to have the experimental music and video duo XUXA SANTAMARIA perform an original work “Untitled (Wall)” at the Internet Archive as part of the Soundwave 8 Biennial Festival on Friday October 26, 2018 at 7pm.

XUXA SANTAMARIA (artist Sofía Córdova and Matthew Gonzalez Kirkland) have created a visual and musical program from video games, Second Life, early screensavers, chat rooms, Myspace and other holdings from the Internet Archive.

Soundwave is a festival of cutting-edge art and music experiences. Each festival season investigates a new idea through sound. This years’ focus is on Infrastructure.

Get Tickets Here

Friday, October 26, 2018
6:00 pm Doors Open
7:00 pm Performance
Internet Archive
300 Funston Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118

 

 

 

 

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Low Vision? Disability? 1.8 Million digital books free, now Worldwide

 

You can take action now to expand access to 1.8million books worldwide.

Individuals can qualify now to access 1.8 million digitized books, free.   Internet Archive has recently expanded its program for those with low vision and disabilities.

Libraries, hospitals, schools, other orgs (worldwide!): can now sign up to authorize users, as well as get digital files for further remediation for qualifying users.

Publishers, please contribute your books for this program!

Service organizations, please host your digital books on archive.org to make seamless access to all books. Free.

Press: please help get the word out, let us know how we can help.

Donations needed to get 4 million more books. Donate books or money (about $20 per book).

Now available for access by anyone with disabilities worldwide… or for anyone to contribute books for people with disabilities: both helped by the US recently adopting the Marrakesh Treaty.

Now is our time to bring together a great library for those with disabilities.

Together we can.

 

 

Posted in Announcements, News | 2 Comments

The Music Modernization Act is now law which means some pre-1972 music goes public

The Music Modernization Act is now US law and the final version of this bill, which seeks to fix a wide range of problems in music copyright law, is not perfect, but it’s better than the version we opposed a few months ago.

One portion of the MMA makes older sound recordings published before 1972 more available to the public. It expands an obscure provision of the library exception to US Copyright Law, Section 108(h), to apply to all pre-72 recordings. Unfortunately 108(h) is notoriously hard to implement. But, as we understand it, the MMA means that libraries can make some of these older recordings freely available to the public as long as we do a reasonable search to determine that they are not commercially available.

We took a look through our collections and found some vinyl rarities. Hopefully more to come. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Announcements, News | 3 Comments

Seder-Masochism Screening at the Internet Archive

The Internet Archive presents the movie Seder-Masochism by Nina Paley on Saturday October 13 at 7:30 pm at our headquarters in San Francisco, with a discussion with Nina Paley afterwards. The doors will open at 7:00 pm.

Seder-Masochism is a 2018 American animated musical comedy film written, directed, produced and animated by American artist Nina Paley. Debuting in the 2018 film festival season, Seder-Masochism has been reviewed positively, with Paley’s bright and satirical style compared to Monty Python. The film reinterprets the Passover Seder against a backdrop of widespread worship of the Great Mother Goddess, showing the rise of patriarchy.

Get FREE Tickets Here

Saturday, October 13, 2018
7:00 pm Doors Open
7:30 pm Film Program
Internet Archive
300 Funston Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118

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Internet Archive expands access to millions of books for people with disabilities


Now, disabled users that are certified by a growing number of organizations can borrow hundreds of thousands of modern books and download mostly older books all for free.

Individuals that are already a qualified user of  NLS-BARD, Bookshare, or Ontario Council of University Libraries Scholar’s Portal (ACE)  can link their archive.org accounts and gain access.

Individuals that are are affiliated with any of these organizations can contact them to authorize their archive.org account for print-disabled access.

Individuals can also request verification for free by filling in this form to contact the Vermont Mutual Aid Society.

We welcome other organizations, such as libraries, schools, hospitals, and dedicated service organizations to join in this free program to certify users for access and also get full access to digital books for further remediation.

If you have questions or suggestions about this program, please contact the Internet Archive. We are excited to be able to offer these services to the print-disabled community.

 

 

 

Posted in Announcements, News | 13 Comments

World’s largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist literature now available on the Internet Archive

The Buddhist Digital Resource Center (BDRC) and Internet Archive (IA) announced today that they are making a large corpus of Buddhist literature available via the Internet Archive. This collection represents the most complete record of the words of the Buddha available in any language, plus many millions of pages of related commentaries, teachings and works such as medicine, history, and philosophy.

BDRC founder E. Gene Smith sits at the computer with Buddhist monks and others

BDRC’s founder, E. Gene Smith, spent decades collecting and preserving Tibetan texts in India before starting the organization in 1999. Since then, as a neutral organization they have been able to work on both sides of the Himalayas in search of rare texts.

Several months ago in a remote monastery in Northeast Tibet, a BDRC employee photographed an old work and sent it in to their library. It was a text that the tradition has always known about, but which was long considered to have been lost. Its very existence was unknown to anyone outside of the caretakers of the monastery that had safeguarded it for centuries.

The Kadampa school, active in the 11th and 12 centuries, was known to scholars – they knew who had started the tradition and where it fit in the history of Buddhism – but most of the writings from that period had not survived the centuries. And yet suddenly here was a lost classic of this tradition, the only surviving manuscript of the work: The exposition on the graduated path by Kadam Master Sharawa Yontan Drak (1070-1141). Dozens of pithy sayings are attributed to Sharawa in later works but this writing of his is never directly cited in the classics of the genre that date back to the fifteenth century and before.

The exposition on the graduated path by Kadam Master Sharawa Yontan Drak (1070-1141).

BDRC’s digitizers never know what they will find when they arrive at a new location, but their work has uncovered missing links, beautiful woodblock versions of known texts, writings of previously unknown authors, and texts by famous people that they thought had been lost to time. While the manuscript above is an amazing find, it is by no means the only one their work has unearthed.

Children holding a manuscript in its box

This work highlights the importance of preserving cultures before they disappear or are too dispersed to gather together. In its efforts to make all of Buddhist literature available, BDRC is also digitizing fragile palm leaf manuscripts in Thailand, Sanskrit texts in Nepal, and the entire Tibetan collection of the National Library of Mongolia. Brewster Kahle, founder of Internet Archive, said, “In 2011 we announced that we had digitized every historic work in Balinese, and this year we are making Tibetan literature available. We hope that this is a trend that will see the literatures of many more cultures become openly available.”

Children studying Buddhist teachings

This is not an academic pursuit. Many Tibetans have left their homeland, spreading to India and around the world. Younger generations who have been displaced and raised in other societies may not have the opportunity to grow up with these traditional teachings. The work of the BDRC is to make those teachings available to everyone.

Jeff Wallman, Executive Director Emeritus of BDRC and Jann Ronis, Executive Director of BDRC, addressed their reasons for making this information available on the Internet Archive: “The founding mission of BDRC is to make the treasures of Buddhist literature available to all on the Internet. We recognize that you cannot preserve culture; you can only create the right conditions for culture to preserve itself. We hope that by making these texts available via the Internet Archive, we can spur a new generation of usage. Openness ensures preservation.”

Buddhist monks

The BDRC’s extensive collection is used by laypeople and monks alike. Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje is a frequent user of their collection. He and other traveling teachers call on the BDRC’s library for references and works when they are away from their libraries, or whenever they need a rare text that they could not otherwise access.

Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, the Abbot of Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling Monastery in Nepal, and a well regarded teacher of Tibetan Buddhism around the world, is gratified that the teachings of Buddha have been made available. “We can share the entire body of literature with every Tibetan who can use it. These texts are sacred, and should be free.”

BDRC’s home office is in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with additional offices and digitization centers in Hangzhou, China; Bangkok, Thailand; Kathmandu, Nepal; and at the National Library of Mongolia in Ulaanbaatar where it is establishing a project in collaboration with the Asian Classics Input Project (ACIP).

Internet Archive and BDRC are both delighted to join forces on sharing the Buddhist literary tradition for the benefit of humanity.

About Buddhist Digital Resource Center

BDRC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to seeking out, preserving, organizing, and disseminating Buddhist literature. Joining digital technology with scholarship, BDRC ensures that the treasures of the Buddhist literary tradition are not lost, but are made available for future generations. BDRC would like every monastery, every Buddhist master, every scholar, every translator, and every interested reader to have access to the complete range of Buddhist literature, regardless of social, political, or economic circumstances. BDRC is headquartered in Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

About Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit digital library based in San Francisco that specializes in offering broad public access to digitized and born-digital books, music, movies and Web pages.

Contacts:
Jann Ronis, BDRC, jann@tbrc.org
Jeff Wallman, BDRC jeffwallman@tbrc.org
Brewster Kahle, Internet Archive, brewster@archive.org
Posted in Announcements, Books Archive, News | 41 Comments

Don’t Click on the Llama

WE HAVE ONE SIMPLE REQUEST…. DO NOT CLICK ON THE LLAMA.

Clicking on the Llama will release Webamp, a javascript-based player that mimics, down to individual strangeness and bugs, the operations of the once dominant Winamp, a media player considered to be one of the classic software creations of the 1990s.

To help you avoid this llama, we’ll tell you it’s in the upper right corner of any Internet Archive item that has a music player in it. This means the Grateful Dead recordings, radio airchecks, network record labels like monotonik, and all manner of podcasts now have the capability to be turned into a Winamp-like player that becomes your new default.

(If, by mistake, you click on the Llama, clicking on it again will turn off the Webamp player and restore the default player.)

This all got started because of the skins.

As part of our celebration of all things Internet, the Archive now has a large collection of Winamp Skins, which were artistic re-imaginings of the Winamp interface, that allowed all sorts of neat creative works on what could have been a basic media player. These “skins” were contributed to over the years (and new ones are still created!) and now number in the thousands. In the collection you’ll see examples of superheroes, video games, surreal images and a pretty wide array of pop stars and celebrities.

We have added over 5,000 skins (with many more coming), and then someone had the bright idea to make the Webamp player work within the Internet Archive to show off these skins, and here we are.

Thanks to Jordan Eldredge and the Webamp programming community for this new and strange periscope into the 1990s internet past.

 

Posted in Announcements, Audio Archive, News, Software Archive | 7 Comments

More than 9 million broken links on Wikipedia are now rescued

As part of the Internet Archive’s aim to build a better Web, we have been working to make the Web more reliable — and are pleased to announce that 9 million formerly broken links on Wikipedia now work because they go to archived versions in the Wayback Machine.

22 Wikipedia Language Editions with more than 9 million links now pointing to the Wayback Machine.

For more than 5 years, the Internet Archive has been archiving nearly every URL referenced in close to 300 wikipedia sites as soon as those links are added or changed at the rate of about 20 million URLs/week.

And for the past 3 years, we have been running a software robot called IABot on 22 Wikipedia language editions looking for broken links (URLs that return a ‘404’, or ‘Page Not Found’). When broken links are discovered, IABot searches for archives in the Wayback Machine and other web archives to replace them with. Restoring links ensures Wikipedia remains accurate and verifiable and thus meets one of Wikipedia’s three core content policies: ‘Verifiability’.

To date we have successfully used IABot to edit and “fix” the URLs of nearly 6 million external references that would have otherwise returned a 404. In addition, members of the Wikipedia community have fixed more than 3 million links individually. Now more than 9 million URLs, on 22 Wikipedia sites, point to archived resources from the Wayback Machine and other web archive providers.

 

 

                   (Broken Link)                                                      (Rescued Page)

One way to measure the real-world benefit of this work is by counting the number of click-throughs from Wikipedia to the Wayback Machine. During a recent 10-day period, the Wikimedia Foundation started measuring external link click-throughs, as part of a new research project (in collaboration with a team of researchers at Stanford and EPFL) to study how Wikipedia readers use citations and external links. Preliminary results suggest that, by far, the most popular external destination was the Wayback Machine, three times the next most popular site, books.google.com. In real numbers, on average, more than 25,000 clicks/day were made from the English Wikipedia to the Wayback Machine.

From “Research:Characterizing Wikipedia Citation Usage/First Round of Analysis

Running IABot on a given Wikipedia site requires both technical integration and operations support as well as the approval of each related Wikipedia community. Two key people have worked on this project.

Maximilian Doerr, known in the Wikipedia world as “Cyberpower”, is a long time volunteer with the Wikipedia community and now a consultant to the Internet Archive. He is the author of the InternetArchiveBot (IABot) software.

Stephen Balbach is a long time volunteer with the Wikipedia community who collaborates with Max and the Internet Archive. He has authored programs that find and fix data errors, verifies existing archives on Wikipedia, and discovers new archives amongst Wayback’s billions of pages and across dozens of other web archive providers.

The number of rescued links, and the quality of the edits, is the result of Max and Stephen’s dedicated, creative and patient work.

What have we learned?

We learned that links to resources on the live web are fragile and not a persistently reliable way to refer to those resources. See “49% of the Links Cited in Supreme Court Decisions Are Broken”, The Atlantic, 2013.

We learned that archiving live-web linked resources, as close to the time they are linked, is required to ensure we capture those links before they go bad.

We learned that the issue of “link rot” (when once-good links return a 404, 500 or other complete failure) is only part of the problem, and that “content drift” (when the content related to a URL changes over time) is also a concern. In fact, “content drift” may be a bigger problem for reliably using external resources because there is no way for the user to know the content they are looking at is not the same as the editor had originally intended.

We learned that by working in collaboration with staff members of the Wikimedia Foundation, volunteers from the Wikipedia communities, paid contractors and the archived resources of the Wayback Machine and other web archives, we can have a material impact on the quality and reliability of Wikipedia sites and in so doing support our mission of “helping to make the web more useful and reliable”.

What is next?

We will expand our efforts to check and edit more Wikipedia sites and increase the speed which we scan those sites and fix broken links.

We will improve our processes to archive externally referenced resources by taking advantage of the Wikimedia Foundation’s new “EventStreams” web service.

We will explore how we might expand our link checking and fixing efforts to other media and formats, including more web pages, digital books and academic papers.

We will investigate and experiment with methods to support authors and editors use of archived resources (e.g. using Wayback Machine links in place of live-web links).

We will continue to work with the Wikimedia Foundation, and the Wikipedia communities world-wide, to advance tools and services to promote and support the use of persistently available and reliable links to externally referenced resources.

Posted in Announcements, News | 111 Comments

Physical Archive Party October 28th, 2018

Archive friends and family please join us for the Physical Archive party, 2-6pm 2512 Florida Avenue, Richmond CA.   RSVP please so we can keep a count.  Staff, partners, friends of the Internet Archive are all invited.

RSVP HERE

This is a unique opportunity to see some of the behind the scenes activities of the Internet Archive and millions of books, music and movie items. The Internet Archive is well known for its digital collections — the digital books, software, film and music that millions of people access every day through archive.org, but did you know that much of our online content is derived from physical collections, stored in the east bay in Richmond?

2018 has been a year of focus on inventory and ramping up throughput at our digitization centers. At the physical archive we see collections of film, software, documents, books, and music at least three times before it is finally archived in Richmond. Once coming in the door to be inventoried, secondly as we ship it out to be digitized in Hong Kong or Cebu, and thirdly coming back to us for long term storage.

This year, the staff at the physical archive would like you to to see the physical archive and celebrate our achievements in 2018. Bring your roller skates and drones for competitive battles, get a drink at the ‘Open Container Bar’ and then peruse the special collections in our dedicated space. Uninhibitedly show off your dance skills at our silent server disco and enjoy brews and Halloween gruel.

We will also be showcasing our collection of books, music and film in both a working environment and our special collections room. We will have tours of our facilities, demonstration of how we get hundreds of thousands books a year digitized at our Hong Kong (and now Cebu) Super Centers and safely back again.

Prize for scariest librarian costume.
This is a halloween event so costumes are encouraged!

Posted in Event, News, Past Event | 1 Comment

Images of Afghanistan 1987-1994

Afghan Media Resource Center’s correspondent interviewing a Muj Commander, 1991

Journalists and others risk their lives to keep the public informed in times of conflict. War imagery provides us with important information in the moment, and creates a trove of invaluable archival content for the future.

Please be aware that this collection contains some disturbing photos of violence and its aftermath (though we have not included any in this blog post).

The Afghan Media Resource Center (AMRC) was founded in Peshawar, Pakistan, in 1987, by a team of media trainers working under contract to Boston University. The goal of the project was to assist Afghans to produce and distribute accurate and reliable accounts of the Afghan war to news agencies and television networks throughout the world.  Beginning in the early 1980’s amidst a news blackout imposed by the Soviet backed Kabul government, foreign journalists had become targets to be captured or killed. The AMRC was an effort to overcome the substantial obstacles encountered by media representatives in bringing events surrounding the Afghan-Soviet war to world attention.

An armed Muj posing for the camera, 1988

Beginning in 1987, a series of six week training sessions were conducted at the AMRC original home in University Town, Peshawar, Pakistan.  Qualified Afghans were recruited from all major political parties, all major ethnic groups and all regions of Afghanistan, to receive professional training in print journalism, photo journalism and video news production.  Haji Sayed Daud, a former television producer and journalist at Kabul TV before the Soviet invasion, was named AMRC Director.

After the completion of their training, 3-person teams were dispatched on specific stories throughout Afghanistan’s 27 provinces, with 35mm cameras, video cameras, notebooks, and audio tape recorders. Photo materials were distributed internationally through SYGMA and Agence France Press (AFP). Video material was syndicated and broadcast by VisNews (now Reuters), with 150 broadcasters in 87 countries, Euronews and London-based WTN (now Associated Press), Thames Television, ITN, Swedish, French, Pakistani and other regional networks.

A young girl carrying clean drinking water, 1989

In 2000 AMRC began publishing a popular and influential newspaper in Kabul: ERADA (Intention). With one interruption, ERADA publication continued until 2012.

Beyond the AMRC archive, the AMRC conducted dozens of training programs and workshops for writers and radio journalists, including training programs for Refugee Women in Development (REFWID). The AMRC also established radio and TV studios in the provincial capitaol, Jalalabad, and produced radio and TV programs, including educational radio dramas, for a variety of international organizations. AMRC also conducted public opinion polls in Afghanistan, including an extensive Media Use Survey in Afghanistan, financed by InterMedia, a Washington, D.C. group.

Armed Muj pulling out an unexploded missile, 1989

The AMRC collection spans a critical period in Afghanistan’s history – (1987 – 1994), including 76,000 photographs, 1,175 hours of video material, 356 hours of audio material, and many stories from print media.

An Afghan weaving carpet, 1990

In 2012 AMRC received a grant to digitize the entire AMRC archive, to preserve the collection at the U.S. Library of Congress. AMRC senior media advisors Stephen Olsson and Nick Mills were trained in the digitization processes by the Library of Congress, then spent two weeks in Kabul training the AMRC staff. The digitization and metadata sheets (in English, Dari and Pashto) were completed in 2016, and were welcomed into the Library of Congress with a formal ceremony.  We are now making the entire AMRC collection available through our on-line partner, The Internet Archive.

Now the entire collection is readily available to scholars, researchers and publishers.  All royalties for commercial use of the photo images and video material will continue to support the non-profit work of the AMRC.
Posted in Announcements, Image Archive, Movie Archive, News | 2 Comments