Category Archives: Event

Ethics In Technology – Community Night and Comedy Show Friday June 21st, 2019 at 6pm

Politics got you down? Looking for a new way to digest ethical quandaries? Feeling like you need some laughter in your life? Have we got the event for you!

Come join us at the Internet Archive for an Ethics In Technology – Community Night and Comedy Show, presented by former Amazon executive and entrepreneur Vahid Razavi, author of “Ethics in Tech, or The Lack There of and Age of Nepotism“.

Enjoy cutting edge performances by a tour de force group of comediennes; Francesca Fiorentini, Chloe McGovern, Annette Mullaney and Abigail See.

In addition, Brett Wilkins will be presenting: Bugsplat: Can Technology Really Make War Less Deadly for Civilians? There will be a showing of the film “Drone” directed by Tonje Hessen and Bob Chandra will give a short talk on the commercialization of military weapons.

Get Tickets Here

$14.00-$25.00

Friday, June 21, 2019

6:00 pm Doors Open – 7:00 pm Program

Internet Archive

300 Funston Avenue San Francisco, CA 94118

Coming this Summer: The First DWeb Camp

Join us for the first ever DWeb Camp at a private farm one hour south of San Francisco.

How do we build a better Web? The Web we want, the Web we deserve? A Web with no central points of control?

Since 2016, we’ve been calling this the Decentralized Web (DWeb for short) and now we are inviting everyone who wants to imagine and co-create that better Web to join us this summer at one of the most beautiful spots on Earth.

The Internet Archive is hosting a community-built event: DWeb Camp from July 18-21, 2019. Or come early and stay late if you want to help build the camp with us: July 15-22, because that’s when the fun begins. DWeb Camp is all about connecting: to your deepest values, to the community around you, and to the planet. Can we come together to imagine and  co-create the technologies, laws, markets and values for the societies we want to live in? REGISTER NOW to attend this first-of-its-kind-event.

We’ll be camping at a farm that’s just a ten-minute hike to this beach, with streams, forests, and trails all around the adjacent private property.

WHERE:  We’ve reserved a private farm one hour south of San Francisco and one hour west of San Jose. It’s surrounded by 600 acres of pristine, untouched coastal land: beach, forest, stream. Once you register, we’ll send you the exact location.

The Farm will rent you a bell tent, cots, and bedding if you don’t have gear of your own.

HOW WILL IT WORK:  bring a tent and sleeping gear, or if you need one, you can rent a tent and bedding from the Farm and they’ll have it set up for you when you arrive. These 5-meter bell tents are big enough for 3-4 people, so invite your friends and share. RVs are welcome too.

All your meals will be covered in the cost of your ticket: healthy, locally-sourced food, some grown on the Farm itself. You should plan to bring all the extras:  snacks, drinks, wine, s’mores, coffee. We won’t be serving alcohol, but it’s BYOB. Bring enough to share! We’ll set up some DIY coffee/tea bars, or you can set up a tent and host your own lounge.  

Galileo Kumavais builds his first decentralized city at the Decentralized Web Summit 2018.

WHO’S INVITED:  DWeb Camp is family-friendly, so you can bring the kids. For the kid in all of us there will be plenty to do from morning yoga, picking berries, watching the sunset on the beach, hiking up a local stream—plus we’ll have kid-friendly activities going on as well. But every child under 18 needs to be accompanied by a parent at all times—no babysitting provided.

Are you a coder, lawyer, artist, activist, armchair philosopher or all of the above, working to create new ways to connect to and through technology? Ready to get your hands dirty and build something new from the ground up? Love to camp, cook, hack, hike, and connect with the great outdoors? Then DWeb Camp may be for you.

Since we’re still working out the kinks, we will be limiting DWeb Camp to 500 people this first year. Sorry, but that means no daytrippers, latecomers, or unregistered drop-ns allowed.

The Farm has a variety of structures to adapt, share, and co-create within. From 44′ domes, a dance floor, and workshop rooms to raw spaces we can shape together.

WHAT’S THE GAME PLAN?  DWeb Camp is a community-built event, so it will be what you make it. We supply the land, some shelter, nourishing food, power and the rest is up to you.

We hope you’ll bring your own project, share your knowledge, launch a conversation, host a tea lounge, offer massages, lead a creative class. The sky’s the limit. Enlist your friends to come and help. Members of the Farm will be creating spaces for meditation, yoga, music making, nature walks, beach hikes, regenerative farming, star gazing, and more.

Imagine what you could build in here?

The Farm has limited connectivity to the internet and little to no cell service. Volunteer teams are setting up a local mesh network throughout the Farm so we can communicate and work offline with the decentralized tools you bring. We’re looking for DWeb communities to build services on top of the mesh.

Why is this important? Because a truly Decentralized Web would work in places where there is limited to no internet connectivity or restrictions due to cost or censorship. The DWeb Camp is a perfect opportunity for us to make local messaging, mapping, websites, and file storage work with community-managed infrastructures in the wild, where we can all be builders and users of our decentralized technologies. Visit our Mesh@DWeb Camp GitHub to get involved now!

HOW CAN I CONTRIBUTE?  Here are the GitHub repositories where we hope to co-organize DWeb Camp with you! Our goal is to make this a volunteer-run event in the future and leave behind a trove of knowledge for others. If you prefer to share information in places other than GitHub, we’ll be publishing a new website with more information in mid-April, and in the meantime, you can always email us at dwebcamp@archive.org with your ideas!

By mid-April, we’ll have a process in place where you can see some of the projects that others are proposing and find ways to pitch in. Better yet: propose your own! Our goal as organizers is to make sure you have a place to land to create magic—but you’ll need to bring just about everything else, just like when you camp!

WHAT KIND OF ENVIRONMENT CAN I EXPECT? The environment is beautiful but raw. California’s northern coast is often shrouded in fog, with temperatures ranging from 72 to 53 degrees. Natives of this area say it never rains here in July, but don’t expect to be diving into the ocean without a wetsuit! You’ll want to bring layers of clothing, and shoes suitable for hiking.

HOW MUCH WILL IT COST?  The true cost for this 4-day camp is $800 per person. We know that’s a lot of money for some, and not that much for others, so we’ll be offering a sliding scale to register, from $200 for students to $1200 for highly resourced professionals who want to sponsor someone else. Kids under 12 come for free.

There will be some limited financial aid and a committee will evaluate each person on the basis of need.

The Farm is also renting 5-meter canvas bell tents with cots and bedding for $400. Put together a group and share! There’s a $100 parking fee if you want to bring your RV.

(For the ultimate non-camper, there is a lodge with suites, cabins, and glamping tents just ten minutes away. But you’ll have to make arrangements on your own.)

WHAT IF I VOLUNTEER?  Volunteers who work three 4-hour shifts (12 hours) during the Camp can qualify for a 50% rebate on their ticket price. Those who come for the Build/Strike days (July 15-22)  and contribute three 8-hour shifts (24 hours) can qualify for a 100% rebate. Volunteer slots are limited and we’ll post a way to apply in mid-April.

What will happen when you put 500 committed people in a beautiful, natural, ocean-front space? We hope to leave you inspired. Recharged. Connected. Grounded. Ready to change the world.

Sign up here for updates.

Questions?  Help us plan by filling out this simple form.

Interested in being a DWeb Camp Sponsor? Contact Wendy Hanamura at wendy@archive.org.


The Lost Landscapes of San Francisco: A Benefit for the Internet Archive — Monday, January 7

Internet Archive is excited to present the 13th annual event in Rick Prelinger’s series of LOST LANDSCAPES OF SAN FRANCISCO, which just filled the Castro Theater for two nights in December.

Get Tickets Here

Combining favorites from past years with this year’s footage discoveries, this feature-length program shows San Francisco’s neighborhoods, infrastructures, celebrations and people from the early 20th century through the 1970s.

New sequences this year include a spoof of San Francisco’s advertising industry in 1953; Native activists riding a boat to the Alcatraz occupation; family life in the Crocker-Amazon district; a hilarious film promoting the new Union Square Garage; men walking cables on the unfinished Bay Bridge; African American tourists in 1970 SF; elementary-school students doing science projects in 1957, the Year of Sputnik; surreal parade floats on Market Street; the Human Be-In in 1966; a whirlwind ride down Geary Boulevard, 1968; model rockets in Ingleside Terrace; the Stoneson organization building houses in 1941; a 1930s Japanese American family living atop a semi-rural Rincon Hill; and much, much more.

AND, FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER: a short subject precedes the show: the world theatrical premiere of a new high-resolution scan of the legendary pre-quake film A TRIP DOWN MARKET STREET BEFORE THE FIRE (filmed April 1906) made from the best existing material, showing detail that no audience has seen in over one hundred years. As always, the audience makes the soundtrack! Come prepared to identify places, people and events, to ask questions and to engage in spirited real-time repartee with fellow audience members.

Monday, January 7
Doors Open and Reception Starts: 6:30pm
Show Begins: 7:30pm

Tickets:  Sliding scale starting at $15,
but no one turned away for lack of funds.

Internet Archive
300 Funston Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118

Get Tickets Here

DJ Spooky’s QUANTOPIA: THE EVOLUTION OF THE INTERNET

We live in a world that is full of algorithms. We have an unconscious relationship to code and numbers. Even creativity is now quantified by data. — DJ Spooky

The Internet Archive is pleased to announce that tickets are now on sale for the World Premiere of DJ Spooky’s QUANTOPIA: THE EVOLUTION OF THE INTERNET—a multimedia hip hop concert experience about the history and exponential growth of the Internet. This new work commissioned by the Internet Archive, created with funding from a Hewlett 50 Arts Commission from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, is set to premiere at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Theater on Friday, January 25, 2019 at 7:30pm.

Get your World Premiere Tickets here

What might the Internet sound like?  How can we visualize the Internet?  Is an algorithm merely an opinion clothed in mathematics?

According to DJ Spooky and his collaborator and data artist Greg Niemeyer, QUANTOPIA is “The utopia of quantification —the dream that we can count, measure, and weigh everything and reach a perfect understanding of the world despite its paradoxes.”

DJ Spooky’s QUANTOPIA: THE EVOLUTION OF THE INTERNET weaves together new compositions, chorus, a string quartet and algorithmically generated images in an immersive aural and visual experience. Described by the composer as an “acoustic portrait of the Internet,” DJ Spooky will perform live loops and layers of sound, alongside musicians from Classical Revolution and San Francisco Girls Chorus, enveloped by data visualization and interactive video design by Greg Niemeyer, with additional visual design created by MEDIUMLABS, and Roger Antonsen.

“Quantopia” Network Visualization by Roger Antonsen

QUANTOPIA commemorates the 50th anniversary of the first sound transmission on the Internet. On October 29, 1969, two young programmers working together by phone attempted to “LOGIN” from the UCLA computer lab to a Stanford Research Institute computer. The system crashed, but with those two momentous keystrokes, “L-O,” the world would never be the same. The ARPANET, precursor to the Internet, was born. Fifty years later, with the Internet’s complete transformation of society, there is a growing sense that technology and humanity are at a crossroad. Traveling through a barcode forest, the audience will witness fifty years, from 1969 to 2019, to consider the social and technical co-construction of the Internet, from the world of big data to information theory.

QUANTOPIA will be presented in three movements and features text from the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and progresses through the creation and expansion of the World Wide Web. The hour-long experience is a multi-sensory journey illuminating ever-present issues of inclusion and exclusion, echo chambers and small-world phenomena. A celebration of the history of the Internet, QUANTOPIA is a tribute to the depth and high stakes of free speech and creative expression involved in our daily use of media.

QUANTOPIA is the first public performance of the Hewlett 50 Arts Commissions funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. This project also represents an artistic extension of the Internet Archive’s work in preservation, open technology, and open access to knowledge. “The idea is having a symphony about the web,” reflects Brewster Kahle, Founder and Digital Librarian of the Internet Archive. “Can we go and learn from that in new and different ways what this Internet thing is?” By leveraging the power of music, the Internet Archive seeks to engage new and younger audiences to think about how they engage with the internet. On the day of the premiere, students from selected programs in the San Francisco Unified School District and the wider Bay Area will attend a special educational presentation at YBCA.

We look forward to seeing our Internet Archive community at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on January 25th at 7.30pm.

Get your tickets today.

QUANTOPIA is commissioned by the Internet Archive, created with funding from a Hewlett 50 Arts Commission from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and presented in association with YBCA. Produced by Sozo Artists, Inc. with additional support from Sozo Impact, Inc.

Join us for A Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain

Check out the photos from the event!

Screen shot from Cecil B. DeMille’s 1923 silent classic, “The Ten Commandments.” On January 1, 2019, this film and tens of thousands of other works will enter the public domain.

It’s time to celebrate!  For the first time in decades, new creative works such as Cecil B. DeMille’s 1923 silent film, “The Ten Commandments,” Kahlil Gibran’s classic “The Prophet,” and Virginia Woolf’s third novel, “Jacob’s Room,” will enter the public domain on the first day of 2019. Please join us for a Grand Re-opening of the Public Domain, featuring a keynote address by Creative Commons’ founder, Lawrence Lessig, on January 25, 2019.  Co-hosted by the Internet Archive and Creative Commons, this celebration will feature legal thought leaders, lightning talks, demos, and the chance to play with these new public domain works. The event will take place at the Internet Archive in San Francisco.

RSVP now before the tickets run out

Kahlil Gibran’s “The Prophet” will enter the public domain on January 1st!

The public domain is our shared cultural heritage, a near limitless trove of creativity that’s been reused, remixed, and reimagined over centuries to create new works of art and science. The public domain forms the building blocks of culture because these works are not restricted by copyright law. Generally, works come into the public domain when their copyright term expires. But U.S. copyright law has greatly expanded over time, so that now many works don’t enter the public domain for a hundred years or more. Ever since the 1998 Copyright Term Extension Act, no new works have entered the public domain (well, none due to copyright expiration). But for the first time this January, tens of thousands of books, films, visual art, sheet music, and plays published in 1923 will be free of intellectual property restrictions, and anyone can use them for any purpose at all.

The cartoons featuring Felix the Cat, 1923, is among the tens of thousands of works that will be full accessible starting 2019.

Join the creative, legal, library, and advocacy communities plus an amazing lineup of people who will highlight the significance of this new class of public domain works. Presenters include Larry Lessig, political activist and Harvard Law professor; Corynne McSherry, legal director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation; Cory Doctorow, science fiction author and co-editor of Boing Boing; Pam Samuelson, copyright scholar; and Jamie Boyle, the man who literally wrote the book on the public domain, and many others.

Continue the celebration at the world premiere of DJ Spooky’s “Quantopia” at the Yerba Buena Center in SF on January 25.

In the evening, the celebration continues as we transition to Yerba Buena Center for the Arts for the world premiere of Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky’s Quantopia: The Evolution of the Internet, a live concert synthesizing data and art, both original and public domain materials, in tribute to the depth and high stakes of free speech and creative expression involved in our daily use of media. Attendees of our Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain event will receive an Internet Archive code for a 20% discount for tickets to Quantopia.

If you’d like to  support the work we do at the Internet Archive, including making these 1923 works available to you for free on January 1,

please donate here.

Schedule of Events:

10am: Doors & Registration

10-11:45am: Interactive public domain demos and project stations with organizations including Creative Commons, Internet Archive, Wikipedia, Authors Alliance, Electronic Frontier Foundation, California Digital Library, Center for the Study of the Public Domain, LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, the Cleveland Art Museum, and many more!

11:45-1pm: Lunch on your own in the Richmond District

1pm-6pm: Program of keynote speakers, lightning talks and panels highlighting the value and importance of the public domain

6pm-7:30pm: Reception

Speakers/Panelists Include:

  • Lawrence Lessig – Harvard Law Professor
  • Cory Doctorow – Author & Co-editor, Boing-Boing
  • Pam Samuelson – Berkeley Law Professor
  • Paul Soulellis – Artist & Rhode Island School of Design Professor
  • Jamie Boyle – Duke Law Professor & Founder, Center for the Study of the Public Domain
  • Brewster Kahle – Founder & Digital Librarian, Internet Archive
  • Corynne McSherry – Legal Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
  • Ryan Merkley – CEO, Creative Commons
  • Jennifer Urban – Berkeley Law Professor
  • Joseph C. Gratz – Partner, Durie Tangri
  • Jane Park – Director of Product and Research, Creative Commons
  • Cheyenne Hohman – Director, Free Music Archive
  • Ben Vershbow – Director, Community Programs, Wikimedia
  • Jennifer Jenkins – Director, Center for the Study of the Public Domain
  • Rick Prelinger – Founder, Prelinger Archives
  • Amy Mason – LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired
  • Paul Keller – Communia Association
  • Michael Wolfe – Duke Lecturing Fellow, Center for the Study of the Public Domain
  • Daniel Schacht – Co-chair of the Intellectual Property Practice Group, Donahue Fitzgerald LLP

Big Tech Comedy Roast at the Internet Archive

Politics got you down? Feeling like you need some laughter in your life? Have we got the event for you!

Come join us at the Internet Archive for a Big Tech Comedy Roast presented by former Amazon executive and entrepreneur Vahid Razavi, author of “Ethics in Tech, or The Lack Thereof and Age of Nepotism“.

The evening is hosted by Will Durst, and also brings us the comedic talents of Francesca Fiorentini, Chloe McGovern, Nichole Spain and Jared Horning.

The New York Times on Will Durst: “Quite possibly the best political satirist working in the country today.” The Boston Globe: “A modern day Will Rogers.”

Get Tickets Here $12.00

Friday, December 14, 2018
6:00 pm Doors Open
7:00 pm Program
Internet Archive
300 Funston Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118

 

Bread and Puppet Theater: The Basic Bye-bye Show

[Now done, some pictures from the event]

The Internet Archive is proud to present a show by the Bread and Puppet Theater on Saturday October 27, 2018 at 7:00 pm.  The Basic Bye-bye Show is a series of quiet object fantasies in black, white, and grey inside a small fabric stage printed with elementary words — “Resist,” “Bread,” “Yes,” “Sky,” “Riot,” “Byebye.”

Bread & Puppet’s director, Peter Schumann, says of the show: “The Basic Bye-bye Show is based on the fact that our culture is saying its basic bye-bye to Mother Earth by continuing the devastating effects of the global economy on our planet.”

Bread and Puppet Theater was founded in 1963 by Peter Schumann on New York City’s Lower East Side. Their traveling puppet shows range from tightly composed theater pieces, to extensive outdoor pageants which require the participation of many volunteers. The Bread and Puppet Theater is one of the oldest, nonprofit, self-supporting theatrical companies in the country.

Get Tickets Here

Saturday, October 27, 2018
6:00 pm Doors Open
7:00 pm Program
Internet Archive
300 Funston Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118

Soundwave 8 Biennial Festival at the Internet Archive: XUXA SANTAMARIA

We are excited to have the experimental music and video duo XUXA SANTAMARIA perform an original work “Untitled (Wall)” at the Internet Archive as part of the Soundwave 8 Biennial Festival on Friday October 26, 2018 at 7pm.

XUXA SANTAMARIA (artist Sofía Córdova and Matthew Gonzalez Kirkland) have created a visual and musical program from video games, Second Life, early screensavers, chat rooms, Myspace and other holdings from the Internet Archive.

Soundwave is a festival of cutting-edge art and music experiences. Each festival season investigates a new idea through sound. This years’ focus is on Infrastructure.

Get Tickets Here

Friday, October 26, 2018
6:00 pm Doors Open
7:00 pm Performance
Internet Archive
300 Funston Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118

 

 

 

 

Seder-Masochism Screening at the Internet Archive

The Internet Archive presents the movie Seder-Masochism by Nina Paley on Saturday October 13 at 7:30 pm at our headquarters in San Francisco, with a discussion with Nina Paley afterwards. The doors will open at 7:00 pm.

Seder-Masochism is a 2018 American animated musical comedy film written, directed, produced and animated by American artist Nina Paley. Debuting in the 2018 film festival season, Seder-Masochism has been reviewed positively, with Paley’s bright and satirical style compared to Monty Python. The film reinterprets the Passover Seder against a backdrop of widespread worship of the Great Mother Goddess, showing the rise of patriarchy.

Get FREE Tickets Here

Saturday, October 13, 2018
7:00 pm Doors Open
7:30 pm Film Program
Internet Archive
300 Funston Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118

Physical Archive Party October 28th, 2018

Archive friends and family please join us for the Physical Archive party, 2-6pm 2512 Florida Avenue, Richmond CA.   RSVP please so we can keep a count.  Staff, partners, friends of the Internet Archive are all invited.

RSVP HERE

This is a unique opportunity to see some of the behind the scenes activities of the Internet Archive and millions of books, music and movie items. The Internet Archive is well known for its digital collections — the digital books, software, film and music that millions of people access every day through archive.org, but did you know that much of our online content is derived from physical collections, stored in the east bay in Richmond?

2018 has been a year of focus on inventory and ramping up throughput at our digitization centers. At the physical archive we see collections of film, software, documents, books, and music at least three times before it is finally archived in Richmond. Once coming in the door to be inventoried, secondly as we ship it out to be digitized in Hong Kong or Cebu, and thirdly coming back to us for long term storage.

This year, the staff at the physical archive would like you to to see the physical archive and celebrate our achievements in 2018. Bring your roller skates and drones for competitive battles, get a drink at the ‘Open Container Bar’ and then peruse the special collections in our dedicated space. Uninhibitedly show off your dance skills at our silent server disco and enjoy brews and Halloween gruel.

We will also be showcasing our collection of books, music and film in both a working environment and our special collections room. We will have tours of our facilities, demonstration of how we get hundreds of thousands books a year digitized at our Hong Kong (and now Cebu) Super Centers and safely back again.

Prize for scariest librarian costume.
This is a halloween event so costumes are encouraged!