CRYPTO CHALLENGE: 3 Donors will match any Crypto Donation this week, 3-to-1!

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us…

Opening line from “A Tale of Two Cities”  by Charles Dickens


For those deeply engaged in cryptocurrencies, the words of Charles Dickens, written 160 years ago, have the ring of prophecy. 2018 was the best and worst of times for those holding bitcoin, ether, OMG or XRP. And yet, for some savvy community members who donated their currencies for good, 2018 was also a “season of light.”  This year Ripple founder, Chris Larsen, donated $29 million in XRP to fulfill the wishes of every classroom teacher on DonorsChoose.org. In March, OmiseGO and Ethereum co-founder, Vitalik Buterin donated $1 million in crypto to help refugees in Uganda. The anonymous philanthropist behind the Pineapple Fund gave away 5,104 bitcoins to 60 charities, including us. Pine writes, “I consider this project a success. If you’re ever blessed with crypto fortune, consider supporting what you aspire our world to be :).”

Now, to close out the year, three generous supporters of the Internet Archive are offering to match any cryptocurrency donation up to a total of $25,000, made before the end of 2018. For the next few days, you can quadruple your impact for good. What better way to put your cryptocurrencies to work this year than by ensuring everyone will have access to world’s knowledge, for free and with complete reader privacy on archive.org?

DONATE CRYPTO NOW & QUADRUPLE YOUR IMPACT

So why should crypto communities support the Internet Archive? Well, we’ve been experimenting alongside crypto founders, developers and dreamers since 2011. Five years ago, the Internet Archive’s founder, Brewster Kahle, wrote this reflection on Dreams Reflected in Bitcoin.  Back then, Kahle wrote about early bitcoiners, “Love the dreamers– they make life worth living.”  

The first bitcoin “ATM” in the Internet Archive offices.  Honor system only. 

Who else but the Internet Archive would set up its own Bitcoin-to-cash converter box in the middle of its office? We convinced the sushi joint next door, Sake Zone, to accept bitcoin. (The owners closed down the sushi restaurant a few years ago, but when we reconnected last year the owner had hodled and said he was starting a bitcoin business!) Meanwhile, we will accept your cryptocurrencies in exchange for Internet Archive beanies and t-shirts.  And back in 2013, a reporter for Bitcoin Magazine wrote an Op-Ed about us paying our employees in BTC, urging others to donate to the Archive. His name was Vitalik Buterin.

Bitcoin Magazine Op-Ed by Vitalik Buterin from February 22, 2013

Back in 2013, Buterin wrote:

When asked why he is so interested in accepting and promoting Bitcoin, Kahle’s response is one that many people in the Bitcoin community can relate to. “I think that at the Internet Archive,” Kahle said in a phone interview, “we see ourselves as coming from the net. As an organization we exist because of the internet, and I think of Bitcoin as a creature of the net. It’s a fantastically interesting idea, and to the extent that we’re all trying to build a new future, a better future, let’s try and round it out.”

So as we wind down our 2018 fundraising campaign, we ask our friends in the crypto community to help the Internet Archive “round it out.”  We’re about $460,000 from reaching our year-end goal. And right now your crypto donation will be matched 3-to-1. We accept dozens of altcoins now, thanks to a partnership with Changelly. Your support will go to building a new and better future on the net. We promise you, it will be crypto well spent.


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The 12 Games of Christmas (And Nearby Holidays)

The Internet Archive has had thousands of games available to play in your browser for over five years now, but the joy of booting up these items immediately never seems to grow old. In fact, the main issue is there’s so many, and they’re from all different eras and times, that it might be worth it to point out 12 Christmas (and general Holiday Season) themed games just to try out.

(Most of these should work fine in most modern browsers, including Chrome, Firefox, and Edge, along with browsers that use the same engines. Safari and Internet Explorer, as well as others, might have issues here and there. Always give Jason Scott, our Software Curator, a heads-up as to what problems you might have.)

DAZE BEFORE CHRISTMAS

The Daze Before Christmas is a platformer for the Sega Genesis. 

This is a pretty wild game, made in 1994 by a Norwegian game studio and featuring a very santa-like character who fights a huge range of enemies across a wide range of levels. Your command buttons are ARROW KEYS for movement, the CTRL key for the A button, ALT/OPTION key for B button, and the SPACE bar for C. The manual for this game is located here.

COMMANDER KEEN: XMAS 2010


A conversion mod was done for an earlier iD Software creation, Commander Keen; again, all the usual sprites and graphics have been totally redone to give us holiday cheer. You can play the redone Commander Keen here.

The commands are the usual ARROW KEYS to move and CTRL to take actions. After a top-down view, it switches to a fast paced platform for everyone’s favorite kid, wearing a Santa hat.

SANTA’S XMAS CAPER

This 1993 platformer game has it all – stunning MS-DOS graphics, slick and easy controls, and a sense of real craft put into every frame. Complete all seven levels and Christmas will be saved.

When you start the game, there’s a small selection screen. Be sure to hit the F key, so you get that rocking Christmas music in the background. Use ARROW KEYS to move and SPACE to… throw snowballs.

NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS: THE HANDHELD

Nightmare Before Christmas ~ Handheld Electronic Game

Trust me, this sounds a lot better than it looks. Part of our larger handheld collection, this license of the original Burton-Selick movie has Jack walking, minding his own business while avoiding snowballs and other creatures. You use the ARROW KEYS as well as the CTRL key to take action, although you’ll be hard pressed to enjoy it! Unless the Pumpkin King holds such a sway with you that you’ll take the effort…

OFFICIAL FATHER CHRISTMAS GAME

This ZX game has a lovely set of colors and graphics as you guide santa through finding pieces of his sleigh, then riding through the night. If you’ve never played a game on the ZX Spectrum (a fascinating machine in its own right) then the controls are going to seem a little bit odd. Be sure to select 1. KEYBOARD at the selection screen, and then check out these controls:

Use the O KEY for left, the P KEY for right, A KEY for down and Q KEY for up. Press SPACE for action and fire. Trust me, the keyboard was very small and your hands would have thanked you, back then.

THE ELF’S CHRISTMAS ADVENTURE



If you ever played text adventures in decades past, you’ll have feelings about the fact they’re still around, still accessible to play, and still text-based interactive stories that allow you to play them one sentence at a time. In this case, you can play THE ELF’S CHRISTMAS ADVENTURE, an Adventure Game Toolkit story of a hapless elf pulled back into an emergency back at the North Pole.

Just curl up near a crackling fire, boot the game up, and start typing commands – you’ll fall into the old fun and frustrations of text adventures in no time.

CHRISTMAS WOLFENSTEIN

The groundbreaking Castle Wolfenstein by iD Software (1992) got a holiday makeover in the late 1990s, with the WWII imagery replaced by trees, wreaths, nutcrackers, banners of holiday cheer – you name it.  Just click here to try this version out.

It’s still a first-person shooter, however, so you’re armed and causing mortal damage, although maybe tell yourself it’s evil people wearing Santa suits at the annual Dungeon Holiday Party. The standard keys work: ARROW KEYS to move and CTRL to fire, with SPACE  to open doors and secret wall entrances.

A POPPLES CHRISTMAS ADVENTURE


This Commodore 64 game is rather slow in places (you can wait a long time for it to load), but a parent playing with a child can enjoy the music and graphics a lot. This 1986 interactive christmas card came from American Greetings. There’s even a singalong! 

(Not kidding about how long it takes to load – but the music and graphics make it worth the wait.)

HOLIDAY LEMMINGS 1993

When Lemmings, an incredibly popular game of the early 1990s, decided to release a holiday version with Christmas themes including graphics and sound, it too was an enormous hit. Some people even preferred it to the original, since it was so incredibly festive and the music was a beautiful Amiga soundtrack of holiday hits. Click here to play.

After a grey bootup screen, the game will come up, with you clicking your mouse into the window to activate the little lemming hand/mouse pointer. Choose PLAY and enjoy the game: You’re guiding dozens of little lemmings dropping out of a trap door to send them into an exit. Assign them different duties (building, digging, blocking) by clicking on the tiles at the bottom. (There are numbers to indicate how many times you can assign the lemmings a job). If you get stuck, there’s a little nuclear option to choose too. 

(If you’ve never played Lemmings before, you’ll be in love with the little guys in minutes.)

JAZZ JACKRABBIT: HOLIDAY HARE 1995

This revamping of the classic platformer JAZZ JACKRABBIT came out as a holiday gift, with a green bunny fighting to save the world while dressed for handing out presents. Use the ARROW KEYS to move around, ALT/OPTION to jump, and SPACE to shoot.

This game is fast, an obvious nod to Sonic the Hedgehog, and so once you get going you’ll be hard-pressed to keep track of everything going on the screen. But the festive graphics and sound will keep you coming back. Click here to play it.

JETPACK CHRISTMAS SPECIAL!

JETPACK CHRISTMAS SPECIAL! is a platformer with a small santa running around collecting presents and causing havoc trying to save Christmas. When starting up the game, press I for an excellent included instruction manual about the backstory and how to play the game. Otherwise:

Press S to start, and then the ARROW KEYS to move, SPACE for your status, ALT/OPTION to thrust, and CTRL to “Phase”. Note that this game is all about the Jetpack, allowing you, Santa, to fly all over the place.

Fun fact: If you leave the title/credits screen going, the snow will start to pile up. 25 years ago, this was a big deal, computer graphics-wise. 

Another fun fact: This game has one of the legendary BOSS KEYS that were a staple of videogames of the time – pressing F10 during the game will kick it over to look like just a regular MS-DOS prompt, complete with blinking cursor. Press F10 again to bring the game right back!

SANTA IS BACK!

Finally, a simple 1993 platformer with lovely music, “Santa is Back!” has Santa running between all manner of platforms, collecting snow globes and presents and all sorts of different holiday items to save Christmas. Just use the ARROW KEYS to move around and the SPACE to kneel. There’s multiple screens and a few short levels. 

Have a delightful holidays, enjoy these many strange and fun games, and thanks for being a user at the Internet Archive!

Posted in News | 1 Comment

The Lost Landscapes of San Francisco: A Benefit for the Internet Archive — Monday, January 7

Internet Archive is excited to present the 13th annual event in Rick Prelinger’s series of LOST LANDSCAPES OF SAN FRANCISCO, which just filled the Castro Theater for two nights in December.

Get Tickets Here

Combining favorites from past years with this year’s footage discoveries, this feature-length program shows San Francisco’s neighborhoods, infrastructures, celebrations and people from the early 20th century through the 1970s.

New sequences this year include a spoof of San Francisco’s advertising industry in 1953; Native activists riding a boat to the Alcatraz occupation; family life in the Crocker-Amazon district; a hilarious film promoting the new Union Square Garage; men walking cables on the unfinished Bay Bridge; African American tourists in 1970 SF; elementary-school students doing science projects in 1957, the Year of Sputnik; surreal parade floats on Market Street; the Human Be-In in 1966; a whirlwind ride down Geary Boulevard, 1968; model rockets in Ingleside Terrace; the Stoneson organization building houses in 1941; a 1930s Japanese American family living atop a semi-rural Rincon Hill; and much, much more.

AND, FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER: a short subject precedes the show: the world theatrical premiere of a new high-resolution scan of the legendary pre-quake film A TRIP DOWN MARKET STREET BEFORE THE FIRE (filmed April 1906) made from the best existing material, showing detail that no audience has seen in over one hundred years. As always, the audience makes the soundtrack! Come prepared to identify places, people and events, to ask questions and to engage in spirited real-time repartee with fellow audience members.

Monday, January 7
Doors Open and Reception Starts: 6:30pm
Show Begins: 7:30pm

Tickets:  Sliding scale starting at $15,
but no one turned away for lack of funds.

Internet Archive
300 Funston Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118

Get Tickets Here

Posted in Announcements, Event, News, Past Event | 1 Comment

New Views Stats for the New Year

We began developing a new system for counting views statistics on archive.org a few years ago. We had received feedback from our partners and users asking for more fine-grained information than the old system could provide. People wanted to know where their views were coming from geographically, and how many came from people vs. robots crawling the site.

The new system will debut in January 2019. Leading up to that in the next couple of weeks you may see some inconsistencies in view counts as the new numbers roll out across tens of millions of items.  

With the new system you will see changes on both items and collections.

Item page changes

An “item” refers to a media item on archive.org – this is a page that features a book, a concert, a movie, etc. Here are some examples of items: Jerky Turkey, Emma, Gunsmoke.

On item pages the lifetime views will change to a new number.  This new number will be a sum of lifetime views from the legacy system through 2016, plus total views from the new system for the past two years (January 2017 through December 2018). Because we are replacing the 2017 and 2018 views numbers with data from the new system, the lifetime views number for that item may go down. I will explain why this occurs further down in this post where we discuss how the new system differs from the legacy system.

Collection page changes

Soon on collection page About tabs (example) you will see 2 separate views graphs. One will be for the old legacy system views through the end of 2018. The other will contain 2 years of views data from the new system (2017 and 2018). Moving forward, only the graph representing the new system will be updated with views numbers. The legacy graph will “freeze” as of December 2018.

Both graphs will be on the page for a limited time, allowing you to compare your collections stats between the old and new systems.  We will not delete the legacy system data, but it may eventually move to another page. The data from both systems is also available through the views API.

People vs. Robots

The graph for new collection views will additionally contain information about whether the views came from known “robots” or “people.”  Known robots include crawlers from major search engines, like Google or Bing. It is important for these robots to crawl your items – search engines are a major source of traffic to all of the items on archive.org. The robots number here is your assurance that search engines know your items exist and can point users to them.  The robots numbers also include access from our own internal robots (which is generally a very small portion of robots traffic).

One note about robots: they like text-based files more than audio/visual files.  This means that text items on the archive that have a publicly accessible text file (the djvu.txt file) get more views from robots than other types of media in the archive. Search engines don’t just want the metadata about the book – they want the book itself.

“People” are a little harder to define. Our confidence about whether a view comes from a person varies – in some cases we are very sure, and in others it’s more fuzzy, but in all cases we know the view is not from a known robot. So we have chosen to class these all together as “people,” as they are likely to represent access by end users.

What counts as a view in the new system

  • Each media item in the archive has a views counter.
  • The view counter is increased by 1 when a user engages with the media file(s) in an item.
    • Media engagement includes experiencing the media through the player in the item page (pressing play on a video or audio player, flipping pages in the online bookreader, emulating software, etc.), downloading files, streaming files, or borrowing a book.
    • All types of engagements are treated in the same way – they are all views.
  • A single user can only increase the view count of a particular item once per day.
    • A user may view multiple media files in a single item, or view the same media file in a single item multiple times, but within one day that engagement will only count as 1 view.
  • Collection views are the sum of all the view counts of the items in the collection.
    • When an item is in more than one collection, the item’s view counts are added to each collection it is in. This includes “parent” collections if the item is in a subcollection.
    • When a user engages with a collection page (sorting, searching, browsing etc.), it does NOT count as a view of the collection.
    • Items sometimes move in or out of collections. The views number on a collection represents the sum of the views of the items that are in the collection at that time (e.g. the September 1, 2018 views number for the collection represents the sum of the views on items that were in the collection on September 1, 2018. If an item moves out of that collection, the collection does not lose the views from September 1, 2018.).

How the new system differs from the legacy system

When we designed the new system, we implemented some changes in what counted as a “view,” added some functionality, and repaired some errors that were discovered.  

  • The legacy system updated item views once per day and collection views once per month. The new system will update both item and collection views once per day.
  • The legacy system updated item views ~24 hours after a view was recorded.  The new system will update the views count ~4 days after the view was recorded. This time delay in the new system will decrease to ~24 hours at some point in the future.
  • The legacy system had no information about geographic location of users. The new system has approximate geolocation for every view. This geographic information is based on obfuscated IP addresses. It is accurate at a general level, but does not represent an individual user’s specific location.
  • The legacy system had no information about how many views were caused by robots crawling the site. The new system shows us how well the site is crawled by breaking out media access by robots (vs. interactions from people).
  • The legacy system did not count all book reader interactions as views.  The new system counts bookreader engagements as a view after 2 interactions (like page flips).
  • On audio and video items, the legacy system sometimes counted views when users saw *any* media in the item (like thumbnail images). The new system only counts engagements with the audio or video media files in an item in those media types, respectively.

In some cases, the differences above can lead to drastic changes in views numbers for both items and collections. While this may be disconcerting, we think the new system more accurately reflects end user behavior on archive.org.

If you have questions regarding the new stats system, you may email us at info@archive.org.

Posted in News, Technical | 7 Comments

Documentation for Public APIs at the Internet Archive

Internet Archive is well-known for our interactive user services.  These include the Wayback Machine, the archive.org website, and OpenLibrary.  Less well known are the programmatic, or API (Application Program Interface) tools that can allow users and computer programs to access archived information “at scale.”

Our APIs evolved over time, adapting to address specific projects and expanding as we introduced new services and capabilities into our operations.  Although not entirely uniform, these APIS were created to encourage developers to add media to archive.org as well as to consume and repurpose metadata and media.

“Items” are the organizational units of Internet Archive.  Our primary APIs interact with items to perform fundamental actions:

  • Write and read metadata to and from Items
  • Write and read media or other files to and from Items

We have recently introduced two new capabilities:

  • Report the interaction and activity that an item has experienced
  • Discover what changes have happened to Internet Archive content

Documentation and examples to use our most important APIs have now been organized at a single location.  We invite our community to review and use this documentation to make use of the information and content in the Internet Archive.

Posted in News | 8 Comments

Working to Keep Positive Copyright Provisions in Canada

We have said previously that Canada is doing a relatively good job of achieving the appropriate balance in its laws between user rights and the rights of authors and publishers.

The Internet Archive joined the Internet Archive Canada today in filing a brief to the Canadian Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Trade (INDU) under that county’s statutory review of its copyright laws.

Our message to INDU is mostly: “don’t back pedal”. We do suggest that if Canada decides to extend its copyright term by 20 years pursuant to the USMCA, that they add a balancing provision allowing libraries to make those older works available to the public.

Our brief here.

Posted in Announcements, News | 5 Comments

Stories that Move Us

Wendy Hanamura, Director of Partnerships, Internet Archive

I have always been a storyteller. It’s how I make sense of the world and share what I value most. And it’s why I have come to love December. Because during this month, when we ask our community to support us, you also take the time to tell us what the Internet Archive means to you.

Thank you!  Thank you for the thousands of messages you send us each day of our campaign. By reading them, I learned what you cherish, how you like to pass your time. I recognize among you poets and pragmatists, idealists and those deeply worried about our future.

Your stories move us to keep improving—to do more.

Here are a few that I’d like to share:

When my boyfriend died, he left behind a ticket stub to a concert that he took me to. I had no idea that he had held on to it for over 30 years. You were able to help me find a recording of that first Grateful Dead concert I ever went to. Listening to it brought back the magic of that night. Thank you.   Robyn

I used free internet resources when I was a penniless student. Now that I have a job, I want to help other penniless students.  Stephen

One of 4 million digital books available on archive.org.

I am a recently retired professor of anthropology, and I am thrilled that I have access to resources that I once only had access to through my university library.  My university ends access to both email accounts and library access upon retirement. Apparently, they assume that retirees immediately lose interest in research when they retire.  Sad. Linda

I am house-bound, reading my only enjoyment. On a fixed income, I appreciate what you provide and wish I could do more to support it.     Barbara

Without BBC radio plays I do not see how I could get through another Canadian winter. . .  Don

I love to read.  I have Chronic Lymphocyctic Leukemia, so it’s hard to go out to shop for books. THANK YOU for this opportunity to read books.  —D.G

I’m a student and I’m doing research about techno, house, clubs and rave culture.  So your site is like a gold mine for me!    Elsa

I’ve searched so many websites for the same opportunities the Internet Archive offers, but was satisfied with none. With the Internet Archive library I feel joyous, happy and calm—cause I know it’s right there. Like my preferred name, I am just a happy reader. Happy Reader

 

Website of the Western Montana Mycological Association, captured in the Wayback Machine on November 22, 2011.

Thanks for helping keep open the only webport our tiny nonprofit has been able to offer since being attacked by WordPress hackers. The information is hard to find and invaluable to educators, poison control centers, and recreationists.   —Western Montana Mycological Association

I donated because civilization devolves into tribal skulduggery when knowledge is allowed to perish. This we must not allow.    —Jamaal

You are like an old hardware store full of vintage nuts and bolts…please stick around!           Happy Surfer

The remedy for Internet Alzheimer’s… Steve

“Wonder in Aliceland” Blog, captured in the Wayback Machine on May 13, 2010.

My daughter’s blog, Wonderinaliceland.blog.com ‘disappeared’ from the web some time ago and my friend Jonathan used your site to retrieve some of her wonderful writing. She has a brain tumor and will not be with us much longer. Her writing was her main way of dealing with her illness over the last eight years.        Peter

I did because I had the option to do, not the obligation, and I love it.  —Tiochan

 

Thank you letters from the Internet Archive to our donors, mailed with vintage stamps.

When your write to us, we like to write back.  So if you find a letter with lots of beautiful stamps in your mailbox, you’ll know who it is from. Although we offer millions of free digital books and billions of Web pages throughout time, at the Internet Archive, we still appreciate a finely crafted 15 cent stamp.

And if you find our services useful, I hope you will make a donation and send us your own stories.  Thank you.

 

Posted in Announcements, News | 4 Comments

Archiving as Activism: Environmental Justice in the Trump Era

By the Environmental Data & Governance Initiative

In November 2016, the U.S. elected a new president who had sworn to roll back important environmental protections, dismantle the EPA, and who had once called climate change a “hoax.” In the context of warming global temperatures, rising tides, and oil pipeline battles, a dozen colleagues at universities and nonprofits across the country got together online, and decided to do something. We were concerned about the continued existence of federal environmental agencies—particularly in their abilities to protect the most vulnerable among us—as well as the preservation and accessibility of important environmental and climate data. More broadly, we were concerned with the collective investment in public research and agencies.

From our initial email we grew into the Environmental Data & Governance Initiative (pronounced “edgy”), today a North American-wide network that includes 175 members from more than 30 different academic institutions, 10 nonprofits, and caring and committed volunteers who come from a broad spectrum of work and life backgrounds. Our work has included crowd-sourced archiving federal environmental datasets, monitoring and reporting on changes to federal environmental agency websites, and interviewing employees at EPA and OSHA. Major news outlets have reported on us, from the Washington Post to CNN to the New York Times, and we have contributed to and helped shape an ongoing, national discussion on the value of federal environmental protections, and the need for accessible and accountable data infrastructures and publicly-engaged forms of data stewardship.

DataRescue event in San Francisco in February 2017. Photo by Jamie Lyons.

So much of what we have been able to accomplish over the past two years is enabled by the Internet Archive, and in particular the Wayback Machine. For example, our first event in December 2016 sought to archive EPA websites, prior to Trump’s inauguration, by nominating key pages and datasets for inclusion in the Wayback Machine. This project grew over the subsequent 5 months, as over 49 DataRescue events were held across the country, and over 63,000 web pages from environmental agencies like EPA, NOAA, NASA, and OSHA were nominated to the archive. The DataRescue project ended in June 2017, but not before raising important questions about the politics of data accessibility and stewardship.

Through DataRescue we began partnering with the Internet Archive, which has become essential in another EDGI project: tracking ongoing changes at federal agency websites. Initially using a fee-based software program, Versionista, to crawl government web pages (currently crawling 42,000 URLs), we have been able to locate and report on the removal or alteration of web content on climate, non-renewable energy sources, and important environmental treaties. This kind of work increasingly relies on the Wayback Machine, and our reports systematically include references and screenshots from it. In our commitment to building participatory and responsive civic technologies and data infrastructure (partly inspired by the Internet Archive), we also developed our own web monitoring software, called Scanner, that is free and open-source, and which we plan to turn into a public platform. We are partnering with the Internet Archive to develop its functionality.

Example of screenshot comparisons (using Versionista) on the EPA website, where references to “climate change” have been deleted.

Let us end with a few words about why this work, and our partnership with the Internet Archive, is so important.

Our current federal records laws are outdated—they do not require online publication or webpage preservation, even as online research and access today is the norm (and the expectation).

Many of us who work with vulnerable communities on environmental justice issues have seen how access to online state environmental data is essential for social groups seeking to learn about and document environmental harms in their community. Data access is a justice issue.

Beyond mere access, we need creative, participatory, community-based, transparent, accountable, and justice-oriented data infrastructures, and new communities of data practice and care. We need these not only to enable government and industry accountability, but to help usher in a better, more just world. The Internet Archive’s commitment to participatory archiving, archiving vulnerable content, and free access, has both inspired and enabled EDGI’s work, and we are glad to partner with the Internet Archive to continue building this important data ecology and community of practice.

–Lindsey Dillon & EDGI

Lindsey Dillon is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the
University of California, Santa Cruz. She is one of the founding members of EDGI.

Posted in Announcements, News | 4 Comments

DJ Spooky’s QUANTOPIA: THE EVOLUTION OF THE INTERNET

This gallery contains 6 photos.

We live in a world that is full of algorithms. We have an unconscious relationship to code and numbers. Even creativity is now quantified by data. — DJ Spooky The Internet Archive is pleased to announce that tickets are now on sale for … Continue reading

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Join us for A Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain

Check out the photos from the event!

Screen shot from Cecil B. DeMille’s 1923 silent classic, “The Ten Commandments.” On January 1, 2019, this film and tens of thousands of other works will enter the public domain.

It’s time to celebrate!  For the first time in decades, new creative works such as Cecil B. DeMille’s 1923 silent film, “The Ten Commandments,” Kahlil Gibran’s classic “The Prophet,” and Virginia Woolf’s third novel, “Jacob’s Room,” will enter the public domain on the first day of 2019. Please join us for a Grand Re-opening of the Public Domain, featuring a keynote address by Creative Commons’ founder, Lawrence Lessig, on January 25, 2019.  Co-hosted by the Internet Archive and Creative Commons, this celebration will feature legal thought leaders, lightning talks, demos, and the chance to play with these new public domain works. The event will take place at the Internet Archive in San Francisco.

RSVP now before the tickets run out

Kahlil Gibran’s “The Prophet” will enter the public domain on January 1st!

The public domain is our shared cultural heritage, a near limitless trove of creativity that’s been reused, remixed, and reimagined over centuries to create new works of art and science. The public domain forms the building blocks of culture because these works are not restricted by copyright law. Generally, works come into the public domain when their copyright term expires. But U.S. copyright law has greatly expanded over time, so that now many works don’t enter the public domain for a hundred years or more. Ever since the 1998 Copyright Term Extension Act, no new works have entered the public domain (well, none due to copyright expiration). But for the first time this January, tens of thousands of books, films, visual art, sheet music, and plays published in 1923 will be free of intellectual property restrictions, and anyone can use them for any purpose at all.

The cartoons featuring Felix the Cat, 1923, is among the tens of thousands of works that will be full accessible starting 2019.

Join the creative, legal, library, and advocacy communities plus an amazing lineup of people who will highlight the significance of this new class of public domain works. Presenters include Larry Lessig, political activist and Harvard Law professor; Corynne McSherry, legal director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation; Cory Doctorow, science fiction author and co-editor of Boing Boing; Pam Samuelson, copyright scholar; and Jamie Boyle, the man who literally wrote the book on the public domain, and many others.

Continue the celebration at the world premiere of DJ Spooky’s “Quantopia” at the Yerba Buena Center in SF on January 25.

In the evening, the celebration continues as we transition to Yerba Buena Center for the Arts for the world premiere of Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky’s Quantopia: The Evolution of the Internet, a live concert synthesizing data and art, both original and public domain materials, in tribute to the depth and high stakes of free speech and creative expression involved in our daily use of media. Attendees of our Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain event will receive an Internet Archive code for a 20% discount for tickets to Quantopia.

If you’d like to  support the work we do at the Internet Archive, including making these 1923 works available to you for free on January 1,

please donate here.

Schedule of Events:

10am: Doors & Registration

10-11:45am: Interactive public domain demos and project stations with organizations including Creative Commons, Internet Archive, Wikipedia, Authors Alliance, Electronic Frontier Foundation, California Digital Library, Center for the Study of the Public Domain, LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, the Cleveland Art Museum, and many more!

11:45-1pm: Lunch on your own in the Richmond District

1pm-6pm: Program of keynote speakers, lightning talks and panels highlighting the value and importance of the public domain

6pm-7:30pm: Reception

Speakers/Panelists Include:

  • Lawrence Lessig – Harvard Law Professor
  • Cory Doctorow – Author & Co-editor, Boing-Boing
  • Pam Samuelson – Berkeley Law Professor
  • Paul Soulellis – Artist & Rhode Island School of Design Professor
  • Jamie Boyle – Duke Law Professor & Founder, Center for the Study of the Public Domain
  • Brewster Kahle – Founder & Digital Librarian, Internet Archive
  • Corynne McSherry – Legal Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
  • Ryan Merkley – CEO, Creative Commons
  • Jennifer Urban – Berkeley Law Professor
  • Joseph C. Gratz – Partner, Durie Tangri
  • Jane Park – Director of Product and Research, Creative Commons
  • Cheyenne Hohman – Director, Free Music Archive
  • Ben Vershbow – Director, Community Programs, Wikimedia
  • Jennifer Jenkins – Director, Center for the Study of the Public Domain
  • Rick Prelinger – Founder, Prelinger Archives
  • Amy Mason – LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired
  • Paul Keller – Communia Association
  • Michael Wolfe – Duke Lecturing Fellow, Center for the Study of the Public Domain
  • Daniel Schacht – Co-chair of the Intellectual Property Practice Group, Donahue Fitzgerald LLP
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